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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:11 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 464
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
TREATY WITH THE SIOUX OF ST. PETER'S RIVER
July 19, 1815
Ratified Dec. 26, 1815.
7 Stat., 127.

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the. Chiefs and Warriors of the Siouxs of the river St. Peter's, on tire part and behalf of their said Tribe, on the other part.

THE parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles:

ARTICLE 1. Every injury or act of hostility committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot.

ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the tribe of the Siouxs of the river St. Peter's; and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed.

ART. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves and their tribe to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other power, nation, or sovereign, whatsoever.

In testimony whereof, the said William Clark, Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners as aforesaid, and the chiefs and warriors of the aforesaid tribe, have hereunto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this nineteenth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.

William Clark, [L. S.]
Ninian Edwards,[L. S.]
Auguste Chouteau,[L. S.]
Enigmanee, that Flies as he Walks, his x mark,[L. S.]
Wasoukapaha, the Falling Hail, his x mark,[L. S.]
Champisaba, the Black War Club, his x mark,[L. S.]
Manpinsaba, the Black Cloud, his x mark,[L. S.]
Tatarnaza, the Iron Wind, his x mark,[L. S.]
Nankanandee, who puts his foot in it, his x mark,[L. S.]


Done at Portage des Sioux, in the presence of

R. Wash, secretary of the commission,
John Miller, colonel Third Infantry,
H. Paul, C. T. of the C.
John T. Chunn, brevet major of the U. S. Army,
Edmund Hall, lieutenant late Twenty-eighth Infantry,
Manuel Lisa, agent,
Thomas Forsyth, Indian agent,
J. W. Johnson, United States Factor and Indian agent.
Maurice Blondeaux,
Louis Decouagne,
John A. Cameron,
Louis Dorion,
Jacques Matte,
sworn interpreters.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:12 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 464
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
TREATY WITH THE SIOUX
June 1,1816,
Proclamation, December 30, 1816.
7 Stat., 143.

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at St. Louis, between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the sai d states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors, representing eight bands of the Siouxs, composing the three tribes called the Siouxs of the Leaf, the Siouxs of the Broad Leaf, and the Siouxs who shoot in the Pine Tops, on the part and behalf of their said tribes, of the other part.

The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribes, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing up on which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles:

ART. 1. Every injury or act of hostility, committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot.

ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States, and all the individuals composing the aforesaid tribes; and all the friendly relations that existed between the m before the war shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed.

ART. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their tribes respectively, do, by these presents, confirm to the United States all and every cession, or cessions, of land heretofore made by their tribes to the British, French, or Spanish government, within the limits of the United States or their territories; and the parties here contracting do, moreover, in the sincerity of mutual friendship, recognize, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract, and agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said tribes or nations.

ART. 4. The undersigned chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, for themselves and their said tribes, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever.

In witness whereof, the commissioners aforesaid, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors as aforesaid, have hereunto subscr ibed their names and affixed their seals, this first day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, and of the independence of the United States the fortieth.


William Clark, [L. S.]
Ninian Edwards, [L. S.]
Auguste Chouteau, [L. S.]
Tatamanee, the Marching Wind, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warmadearwarup, the Man who looks at the Calumet Eagle, his x mark, [L. S.]
Peneshon, his x mark, [L. S.]
Kanggawashecha, or French Crow, his x mark, [L. S. ]
Eanggamanee, the Runner, his x mark [L. S.]
Tatangascartop, the Playing Buffalo, his x mark, [L. S.]
Tatangamarnee, the Walking Buffalo, or Red Wing, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warseconta, who shoots in the Pine tops, his x mark, [L. S.]
Weeshto, the Shoulder, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warmarnosa, the Thief, his x mark, [L. S.]
Shutkaongka, the Bird on the Limb, his x mark, [L. S.]
Shakaska, White Nails, his x mark, [L. S.]
Shuskamanee, the Walking Bird, his x mark, [L. S. ]
Manakohomonee, the Turning Iron, his x mark, [L. S.]
Oocus, the Watchman, his x mark, [L. S.]
Pahataka, the Humming Bird, his x mark, [L. S.]
Eaohungko, the Man who marches quick, his x mark, [L. S.]
Medermee, the Muddy Lake, his x mark, [L. S.]
Tatawaka, the Medicine Wind, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warshushasta, the Bad Hail, his x mark, [L. S.]
Eoshark, the Belly-Ache, his x mark, [L. S.]
Tuquaacundup, the Doctor, his x mark, [L. S.]
Onudokea, the Fluttering E agle, his x mark, [L. S.]
Tusarquarp, he that walks with a Cane, his x mark, [L. S.]
Markpeasena, the Black Cloud, his x mark. [L. S.]
Warksua, nanee, the Man who is sick when he walks, his x mark, [L. S.]
Otangganianee, the Man with a strong voice, his x mark, [L. S.]
Hungkrehearpee, or the Half of his Body Gray, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warpearmusee, the Iron Cloud, his x mark, [L. S.]
Etoagungamanee, the White Face, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warchesunsapa, the Negro, his x m ark, [L. S.]
Ehaarp, the Climber, his x mark, [L. S.]
Nahre, the Shifting Shadow, his x mark, [L. S.]
Hapula, the fourth Son, his x mark, [L. S.]
Marc4wachup, the Dancer, his x mark, [L. S.]
Shantanggaup, the Big Tree, his x mark, [L. S.]
Shongkaska, the White Big-cared Dog, his x mark, [L. S.]
Hasanee, the Buffalo with one Horn, his x mark, [L. S.]
Narissakata, the Old Man who can hardly walk, his x mark, [L. S.]
Aearpa, the Speaker, his x mark, [L. S.]
Mu ckpeasarp, the Black Cloud, his x mark, [L. S.]


Done at St. Louis, in the presence of

R. Wash, secretary to the commission,
R. Paul, C. T. of the C.
Wm. O. Allen, captain U. S. Corps Artillery,
H. S. Geyer,
Joshua Norvell, judge advocate
M. M. N. Boilvin, agent,
Thomas Forsyth, India agent,
Maurice Blondeaux,
Henry Delorier, interpreter,
Pierre Lapointe, interpreter,
Samuel Solomon, interpreter,
Jacques Mette, interpreter,
Cere,
Richard Cave,
Willi Cave,
Julius Pescay.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:13 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 464
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Treaty with the Teton, Etc., Sioux
June 22, 1825
Proclamation, Feb. 6, 1826
7 Stat., p. 250


Treaty with the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands of the Sioux tribe of Indians.

For the purposes of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands of the Sioux tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States army, and Major Benjamin O'Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, head men and Warriors of the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands of the Sioux tribe of Indians, on behalf of said bands or tribe of the other part, have made and entered into the following Articles and Conditions; which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate; shall be binding on both parties--to wit:


ARTICLE 1.

It is admitted by the Teton, Yancton and Yanctonies bands of Sioux Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said bands also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them.


ARTICLE 2.

The United States agree to receive the said Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies band of Sioux Indians into their friendship, and under their protection, and to extend to them, from time to time, such benefits and acts of kindness as may be convenient, and seem just and proper to the President of the United States.


ARTICLE 3.

All trade and intercourse with the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands shall be transacted at such place or places as may be designated and pointed out by the President of the United States, through his agents; and none but American citizens, duly authorized by the United States, shall be admitted to trade or hold intercourse with said bands of Indians.


ARTICLE 4.

That the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands may be accommodated with such articles of merchandise, &c as their necessities may demand, the United States agree to admit and license traders to hold intercourse with said tribes or bands, under mild and equitable regulations: in consideration of which, the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands bind themselves to extend protection to the persons and the property of the traders, and the persons legally employed under them, whilst they remain within the limits of their particular district of country. And the said Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands further agree, that if any foreigner or other person, not legally authorized by the United States, shall come into their district of country, for the purposes of trade or other views, they will apprehend such person or persons, and deliver him or them to some United States superintendent, or agent of Indian Affairs, or to the nearest military post, to be dealt with according to law.And they further agree to give safe conduct to all persons who may be legally authorized by the United States to pass through their country: and to protect, in their persons and property, all agents or other persons sent by the United States to reside temporarily among them.


ARTICLE 5.

That the friendship which is now established between the United States and the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands should not be interrupted by the misconduct of individuals, it is hereby agreed, that for injuries done by individuals, no private revenge or retaliation shall take place, but instead thereof, complaints shall be made, by the party injured, to the superintendent or agent of Indian affairs, or other person appointed by the President; and it shall be the duty of the said Chiefs, upon complaint being made as aforesaid, to deliver up the person or persons against whom the complaint is made, to the end that he or they may be punished agreeably to the laws of the United States. And, in like manner, if any robbery, violence, or murder, shall be committed on any Indian or Indians belonging to said bands, the person or persons so offending shall be tried, and if found guilty, shall be punished in like manner as if the injury had been done to a white man. And it is agreed, that the chiefs of the said Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands shall, to the utmost of their power, exert themselves to recover horses or other property, which may be stolen or taken from any citizen or citizens of the United States by any individual or individuals of said bands; and the property so recovered shall be forthwith delivered to the agents, or other person authorized to receive it, that it may be restored to the proper owner. And the United States hereby guaranty to any Indian or Indians of said bands, a full indemnification for any horses or other property which may be stolen from them by any of their citizens: Provided, That the property so stolen cannot be recovered, and that sufficient proof is produced that it was actually stolen by a citizen of the United States. And the said Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands engage, on the requisition or demand of the President of the United States, or of the agents, to deliver up any white man resident among them.


ARTICLE 6.

And the Chiefs and Warriors, as aforesaid, promise and engage, their band or tribe will never, by sale, exchange, or as presents, supply any nation or tribe of Indians, not in amity with the United States, with guns, ammunition, or other implements of war.

Done at fort Look-out, near the three rivers of the Sioux pass, this 22d day of June, A. D. 1825, and of the independence of the United States the forty-ninth.

In testimony whereof the said commissioners, Henry Atkinson and Benjamin O'Fallon, and the chiefs, head men, and warriors, of the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands, of Sioux tribe, have hereunto set their hands, and affixed their seals.

H. Atkinson, brigadier general U. S. Army. [L. S.]
Benj. O'Fallon, United States Agent Indian Affairs Yanctons, [L. S.]


Maw-too-an-be-kin, the black bear, his x mark, [L. S.]
Wacan-o-hi-gnan, the flying medi-cine, his x mark, [L. S.]
Wah-ha-ginga, the little dish, his x mark, [L. S.]
Cha-pon-ka, the musqueto, his x mark, [L. S.]
Eta-ke-nus-ke-an, the mad face, his x mark, [L. S.]
To-ka-oo, the one that kills, his x mark, [L. S.]
O-ga-tee, the fork, his x mark, [L. S.]
You-ia-san, the warrior, his x mark, [L. S.]
Wah-ta-ken-do, the one who comes from war, his x mark, [L. S.]
To-qui-in-too, the little soldier, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ha-sas-hah, the Ioway, his x mark, [L. S.]
Tetons:
Ta-tan-ka-guenish-qui-gnan, the mad buffalo, his x mark, [L. S.]
Mah-to-ken-do-ha-cha, the hollow bear, his x mark, [L. S.]
E-gue-mon-wa-con-ta, the one that shoots at the tiger, his x mark, [L. S.]
Jai-kan-kan-e, the child chief, his x mark, [L. S.]
Shawa-non, or O-e-te-kah, the brave, his x mark, [L. S.]
Man-to-dan-za, the running bear, his x mark, [L. S.]
Wa-can-guela-sassa, the black lightning, his x mark,- [L. S.]
Wa-be-la-wa-con, the medicine war eagle, his x mark, [L. S.]
Cam-pes-cah-o-ran-co, the swift shell, his x mark, [L. S.]
Eh-ra-ka-che-ka-la, the little elk, his x mark, [L. S.]
Na-pe-a-mus-ka, the mad hand, his x mark, [L. S.]
J-a-pee, the soldier, his x mark, [L. S.]
Hoo-wa-gah-hak, the broken leg, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ce-cha-he, or the burnt thigh, his x mark, [L. S.]
O-caw-see-non-gea, or the spy, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ta-tun-ca-see-ha-hue-ka, the buffalo with the long foot, his x mark [L. S.]
Ah-kee-che-ha-che-ga-la, the little soldier, his x mark [L. S.]


In presence of--

A. L. Langham, secretary to the commission,
H. Leavenworth, colonel, U. S. Army,
S. W. Kearney, brevet major, First Infantry,
G. H. Kennerly, U. S. S. Indian agent,
P. Wilson, U. S. S. Indian agent,
Wm. Armstrong, captain, Sixth Regiment Infantry,
R. B. Mason, captain, First Infantry,
J. Gantt, captain, Sixth Infantry,
S. Mac Ree, lieutenant and aid de camp,
Wm. S. Harney, lieutenant, First Infantry,
Thomas Noel, lieutenant, Sixth Infantry.
B. Riley, captain, Sixth Infantry,
James W. Kingsbury, lieutenant, First Regiment,
S. Wragg, adjutant, First Regiment,
G. C. Spencer, captain, First Regiment,
A. S. Miller, lieutenant, First Infantry,
H. Swearingen, lieutenant, First Infantry,
Thos. P. Gwynn, lieutenant, First Infantry,
M. W. Batman, lieutenant, Sixth Infantry,
George C. Hutter, lieutenant, Sixth Infantry,
J. Rogers, lieutenant, Sixth Infantry,
Wm. Day, lieutenant, First Infantry,
John Gale, surgeon, U. S. Army,
D. Ketchurn, major, U.S. Army,
R. H. Stuart, lieutenant, First Infantry,
Wm. Gordon,
Jean Baptiste Dorion.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:14 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 464
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
TREATY WITH THE SIOUNE AND OGLALA TRIBES
July 12, 1825
Proclamation, Feb. 6, 1826
7 Stat., p. 252.


For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Sioune and Ogallala bands of the Sioux tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States Army, and Major Benjamin O'Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors, of the said Sioune and Ogallala bands of Sioux Indians, on behalf of their bands, of the other part, have made and entered into the following articles and conditions, which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate shall be binding on both parties,to wit:


ARTICLE 1.

It is admitted by the Sioune and Ogallala bands of Sioux Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said bands also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them.


ARTICLE 2.

The United States agree to receive the Sioune and Ogallala bands of Sioux into their friendship, and under their protection, and to extend to them, from time to time, such benefits and acts of kindness as may be convenient, and seem just and proper to the President of the United States.


ARTICLE 3.

All trade and intercourse with the Sioune and Ogallala bands shall be transacted at such place or places as may be designated and pointed out by the President of the United States, through his agents; and none but American citizens, duly authorized by the United States, shall be admitted to trade or hold intercourse with said bands of Indians.


ARTICLE 4.

That the Sioune and Ogallala bands may be accommodated With such articles of merchandise, &c, as their necessities may demand, the United States agree to admit and license traders to hold intercourse with said bands, under mild and equitable regulations: in consideration of which, the Sioune and Ogallala bands bind themselves to extend protection to the persons and the property of the traders, and the persons legally employed under them, whilst they remain within the limits of their particular district of country. And the said Sioune and Ogallala bands further agree, that if any foreigner or other persons, not legally authorized by the United States, shall come into their district of country, for the purposes of trade or other views, they will apprehend such person or persons, and deliver him or them to some United States superintendent, or agent of Indian affairs, or to the commandant of the nearest military post, to be dealt with according to law.And they further agree to give safe conduct to all persons who may be legally authorized by the United States to pass through their country; and to protect, in their persons and property, all agents or other persons sent by the United States to reside temporarily among them; nor will they, whilst on their distant excursions, molest or interrupt any American citizen or citizens who may be passing from the United States to New Mexico or returning from thence to the United States.


ARTICLE 5.

That the friendship, which is now established between the United States and the Sioune and Ogallala bands should not be interrupted by the misconduct of individuals, it is hereby agreed, that for injuries done by individuals, no private revenge or retaliation shall take place, but instead thereof, complaints shall be made, by the injured party, to the superintendent or agent of Indian affairs, or other person appointed by the President; and it shall be the duty of said Chiefs, upon complaint being made as aforesaid, to deliver up the person or persons, against whom the complaint is made, to the end that he or they may be punished agreeably to the laws of the United States. And, in like manner, if any robbery, violence or murder, shall be committed on any Indian or Indians belonging to the said bands, the person or persons so offending shall be tried, and if found guilty shall be punished in like manner as if the injury had been done to a white man. And it is agreed, that the chiefs of said Sioune and Ogallala bands shall, to the utmost of their power, exert themselves to recover horses or other property, which may be stolen or taken from any citizen or citizens of the United States, by any individual or individuals of said bands; and the property so recovered shall be forthwith delivered to the agents or other person authorized to receive it, that it may be restored to the proper owner. And the United States hereby guaranty to any Indian or Indians of said bands, a full indemnification for any horses or other property which may be stolen from them by any of their citizens: Provided, The property stolen cannot be recovered, and that sufficient proof is produced that it was actually stolen by a citizen of the United States. And the said Sioune and Ogallala bands engage, on the requisition or demand of the President of the United States, or of the agents, to deliver up any white man resident among them.


ARTICLE 6.

And the Chiefs and Warriors, as aforesaid, promise and engage, that their bands will never, by sale, exchange, or as presents, supply any nation, tribe, or band of Indians, not in amity with the United States, with guns, ammunition, or other implements of war. Done at the mouth of the Teton river, this 5th day of July, A. D. 1825, and of the independence of the United States the fiftieth.

In testimony whereof, the said commissioners, Henry Atkinson and Benjamin O'Fallon, and the chiefs, head men, and warriors, of the Sioune and Ogallala bands, have hereunto set their hands, and affixed their seals.

H. Atkinson, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army. [L. S.]
Benj. O' Fallon, United States agent Indian Affairs. [L. S.]
Siounes chiefs:
Wah-e-ne-ta, the Rushing Man, his x mark, [L. S.]
Cah-re-we-ca-ca, the Crow Feather, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ma-ra-sea, the White Swan, his x mark, [L. S.]
Chan-dee, theTobacco, his x mark, [L. S.]
O-ke-ma, the Chief, his x mark, [L. S.]
Tow-cow-sa'-no-pa, the Two Lance, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warriors:
Chan-ta-wah-nee-cha, the Notieart, his x mark, [L. S.]
He-hum-pee, the one that has a voice in his neck, his x mark, [L. S.]
Num-cah-pay, the one that knocks down two, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ogallala chiefs:
Ta-tun-ca-nash-sha, the Standing Buffalo, his x mark, [L. S.]
He-a-long-ga, the Shoulder, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ma-to-weet-co, the Full White Bear, his x mark, [L. S.]
Wa-na-re-wag-she-go, the Ghost Boy, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warriors:
Ek-hah-ka-sap-pa, the Black Elk, his x mark, [L. S.]
Tah-tong-ish-nan-na, the One Buffalo, his x mark, [L. S.]
Mah-to-ta-tong-ca, the Buffalo White Bear, his x mark, [L. S.]
Nah-ge-nish-ge-ah, the Mad Soul, his x mark, [L. S.]


Siounes of the Fire-hearts band who sign at Camp Hidden Creek, on the 12th July, 1825:

Chiefs:
Chan-ta-pa-ta, the Fire-heart, his x mark, [L. S.]
Wah-con-ta-mon-ee, the one that shoots as he walks, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ke-ah-ash-sha-pa, the one that makes a noise as he flies, his x mark, [L. S.]
Warriors:
Mato-co-kee-pa, the one that is afraid of the White Bear, his x mark. [L. S.]
Ho-ton-co-kee-pa, the one that is afraid of his voice, his x mark, [L. S.]
Wom-dish-ki-a-ta, the Spotted War Eagle, his x mark, [L. S.]
Cha-lon-we-eha-ea-ta, the one that kills the buffalo, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ca-re-no-pa, the Two Crows, his x mark, [L. S.]
Ca-re-a-tun-ca, the Crow that sits down, his x mark, [L. S.]
To-ke-a-we-cha-ca-ta, the one that kills first, his x mark, [L. S.]

In the presence of--

P. Wilson, U. S. S. Indian agent,
John Gale, surgeon, U. S. Army,
D. Ketchum, major, U. S. Army,
Levi Nute, lieutenant, U. S. Army,
G. C. Spencer, captain, First Infantry,
M. W. Batman, lieutenant, Sixth Infantry,
Wm. Armstrong, captain, Sixth Regiment Infantry,
Jas. W. Kingsbury, lieutenant, First Regiment Infantry,
R. Holmes, lieutenant, Sixth Infantry,
R. M. Coleman, U. S. Army,
W. L. Harris, lieutenant, First Infantry,
H. Leavenworth, colonel, U. S. Army,
B. Riley, captain, Sixth Infantry,
S. Wragg, adjutant, First Regiment Infantry,
Wm. Day, lieutenant, U. S. Army,
C. Pentland, captain, Sixth Infantry,
G. H. Kennerly, U. S. S. Indian agent,
Thos. P. Gwynn, lieutenant, First Infantry.


Witnesses to the signatures of the Fire-hearts band, as executed on the 12th July, 1825:


A. L. Langham, secretary to the Commission,
G. H. Kennerly, U. S. S. Indian agent,
H. Leavenworth, colonel, U. S. Army,
S. W. Kearny, brevet major, First Infantry,
P. Wilson, U. S. S. Indian agent,
R. M. Coleman, U. S. Army,
Wm. Armstrong, captain, Sixth Regiment Infantry,
J. Gantt, captain, Sixth Infantry.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:15 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 464
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
TREATY WITH THE HUNKPAPA BAND OF THE SIOUX TRIBE
July 16, 1825
Proclamation, Feb. 6, 1826
7 Stat., 257.

For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Hunkpapas band of the Sioux tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States Army, and Major Benjamin O'Fallon, Indian agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Headmen, and Warriors of the said Hunkpapas band of Sioux Indians, on behalf of their band, of the other part, have made and entered into the following Articles and Conditions; which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties.


ARTICLE 1.

It is admitted by the Hunkpapas band of Sioux Indians that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said band also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them.


ARTICLE 2.
The United States agree to receive the Hunkpapas band of Sioux into their friendship, and under their protection, and to extend to them from time to time such benefits and acts of kindness as may be convenient, and seem just and proper to the President of the United States.


ARTICLE 3.

All trade and intercourse with the Hunkpapas band shall be transacted at such place or places as may be designated and pointed out by the President of the United States, through his agents; and none but American citizens, duly authorized by the United States, shall be admitted to trade or hold intercourse with said band of Indians.


ARTICLE 4.

That the Hunkpapas band may be accommodated with such articles of merchandise, &c., as their necessities may demand, the United States agree to admit and license traders to hold intercourse with said band under mild and equitable regulations: in consideration of which, the Hunkpapas band bind themselves to extend protection to the persons and the property of the traders, and the persons legally employed under them, whilst they remain within the limits of their particular district of country. And the said Hunkpapas band further agree, that if any foreigner, or other person not legally authorized by the United States, shall come into their district of country, for the purposes of trade or other views, they will apprehend such person or persons, and deliver him or them to some United States superintendent or agent of Indian affairs, or to the commandant of the nearest military post, to be dealt with according to law. And they further agree to give safe conduct to all persons who may be legally authorized by the United States to pass through their country, and to protect in their persons and property all agents or other persons sent by the United States to reside temporarily among them.


ARTICLE 5.

That the friendship which is now established between the United States and the Hunkpapas band should not be interrupted by the misconduct of individuals, it is hereby agreed that, for injuries done by individuals, no private revenge or retaliation shall take place, but instead thereof, complaints shall be made, by the injured party, to the superintendent or agent of Indian affairs, or other person appointed by the President: and it shall be the duty of said Chiefs, upon complaint being made as aforesaid, to deliver up the person or persons against whom the complaint is made, to the end that he or they may be punished agreeably to the laws of the United States. And in like manner, if any robbery, violence, or murder, shall be committed on any Indian or Indians belonging to the said band, the person or persons so offending shall be tried, and if found guilty, shall be punished in like manner as if the injury had been done to a white man. And it is agreed, that the chiefs of said Hunkpapas band shall, to the utmost of their power, exert themselves to recover horses or other property, which may be stolen or taken from any citizen or citizens of the United States, by any individual or individuals of said band; and the property so recovered shall be forthwith delivered to the agents or other person authorized to receive it, that it may be restored to the proper owner. And the United States hereby guarranty to any Indian or Indians of said band, a full indemnification for any horses or other property which may be stolen from them by any of their citizens: Provided, That the property stolen cannot be recovered, and that sufficient proof is produced that it was actually stolen by a citizen of the United States. And the said Hunkpapas band engage, on the requisition or demand of the President of the United States, or of the-agents, to deliver up any white man resident among them.


ARTICLE 6.

And the Chiefs and Warriors, as aforesaid, promise and engage that their band will never, by sale, exchange, or as presents, supply any nation or tribe of Indians, not in amity with the United States, with guns, ammunition, or other implements of war.

Done at the Auricara Village, this sixteenth day of July, A. D. 1825, and of the independence of the United States the fiftieth.

In testimony whereof, the said commissioners, Henry Atkinson, and Benjamin O'Fallon, and the chiefs, head men, and warriors of the Hunkpapas tribe of Indians, have hereunto set their hands and affixed their seals.

H. Atkinson, brigadier-general, U. S. Army, [L. S.]
Benj. O' Fallon, United States agent Indian affairs, [L. S.]


Mato-che-gal-lah, Little White Bear, his x mark, [L. S.]
Cha-sa-wa-ne-che, the one that has no name, his x mark, [L. S.]
Tah-hah-nee-ah, the on e that scares the game, his x mark, [L. S.]


In presence of--

A. L. Langham, secretary to the commission,
H. Leavenworth, colonel, U. S. Army,
P. Wilson, U. S. S. Indian agent,
G. H. Kennedy, U. S. S. Indian agent,
G. C. Spencer, captain, First Infantry,
John Gale, surgeon, U. S. Army,
R. M. Coleman, U. S. Army,
John Gantt, captain, Sixth Infantry,
Taw-ome-nee-o-tah, the Womb, his x mark,
Mah-to-wee-tah, the White Bear's face, his x mark,
Pah-sal-sa, the Auricara, his x mark,
Ha-hah-kus-ka, the White Elk, his x mark,
J. Rogers, lieutenant, Sixth Infantry,
D. Ketchum, major, U. S. Army,
Jas. W. Kingsbury, lieutenant, First Regiment Infantry,
Thomas Noel, lieutenant, Sixth Infantry,
R. H. Stuart, lieutenant, First Infantry.
Levi Nute, lieutenant, U. S. Army,
Collin Campbell.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:16 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
TREATY WITH THE SIOUX, ETC.
August 19, 1825
Proclamation. Feb. 6, 1826.
7 Stat., 272.

Treaty with the Sioux and Chippewa, Sacs and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Sioux, Winnebago, and a portion of the Ottawa, Chippewa, Potawattomie, Tribes.

THE United States of America have seen with much regret, that wars have for many years been carried on between the Sioux and the Chippewas, and more recently between the confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux; and also between the Ioways and Sioux; which, if not terminated, may extend to the other tribes, and involve the Indians upon the Missouri, the Mississippi, and the Lakes, in general hostilities. In order, therefore, to promote peace among these tribes, and to establish boundaries among them and the other tribes who live in their vicinity, and thereby to remove all causes of future difficulty, the United States have invited the Chippewa, Sac, and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Sioux, Winnebago, and a portion of the Ottowa, Chippewa and Potawatomie Tribes of Indians living upon the Illinois, to assemble together, and in a spirit of mutual conciliation to accomplish these objects; and to aid therein, have appointed William Clark and Lewis Cass, Commissioners on their part, who have met the Chiefs, Warriors, and Representatives of the said tribes, and portion of tribes, at Prairie des Chiens, in the Territory of Michigan, and after full deliberation, the said tribes, and portions of tribes, have agreed with the United States, and with one another, upon the following articles:


ARTICLE 1.

There shall be a firm and perpetual peace between the Sioux and Chippewas; between the Sioux and the confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes; and between the Ioways and the Sioux.


ARTICLE 2.

It is agreed between the confederated Tribes of the Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux, that the Line between their respective countries shall be as follows: Commencing at the mouth of the Upper Ioway River, on the west bank of the Mississippi, and ascending the said Ioway river, to its left fork; thence up that fork to its source; thence crossing the fork of Red Cedar River, in a direct line to the second or upper fork of the Desmoines river; and thence in a direct line to the lower fork of the Calumet river; and down that river to its juncture with the Missouri river. But the Yancton band of the Sioux tribe, being principally interested in the establishment of the line from the Forks of the Desmoines to the Missouri, and not being sufficiently represented to render the definitive establishment of that line proper, it is expressly declared that the line from the forks of the Desmoines to the forks of the Calumet river, and down that river to the Missouri, is not to be considered as settled until the assent of the Yancton band shall be given thereto. And if the said band should refuse their assent, the arrangement of that portion of the boundary line shall be void, and the rights of the parties to the country bounded thereby, shall be the same as if no provision had been made for the extension of the line west of the forks of the Desmoines. And the Sacs and Foxes relinquish to the tribes interested therein, all their claim to land on the east side of the Mississippi river.


ARTICLE 3.

The Ioways accede to the arrangement between the Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux; but it is agreed between the Ioways and the confederated tribes of the Sacs and Foxes, that the Ioways have a just claim to a portion of the country between the boundary line described in the next preceding article, and the Missouri and Mississippi; and that the said Ioways, and Sacs and Foxes, shall peaceably occupy the same, until some satisfactory arrangement can be made between them for a division of their respective claims to country.


ARTICLE 4.

The Ottoes not being represented at this Council, and the Commissioners for the United States being anxious that justice should be done to all parties, and having reason to believe that the Ottoes have a just claim to a portion of the country upon the Missouri, east and south of the boundary line dividing the Sacs and Foxes and the Ioways, from the Sioux, it is agreed between the parties interested therein, and the United States, that the claim of the Ottoes shall not be affected by any thing herein contained; but the same shall remain as valid as if this treaty had not been formed.


ARTICLE 5.

It is agreed between the Sioux and the Chippewas, that the line dividing their respective countries shall commence at the Chippewa River, half a day's march below the falls; and from thence it shall run to Red Cedar River, immediately below the falls; from thence to the St. Croix River, which it strikes at a place called the standing cedar, about a day's paddle in a canoe, above the Lake at the mouth of that river; thence passing between two lakes called by the Chippewas "Green Lakes," and by the Sioux "the lakes they bury the Eagles in," and from thence to the standing cedar that "the Sioux Split;" thence to Rum River, crossing it at the mouth of a small creek called choaking creek, a long day's march from the Mississippi; thence to a point of woods that projects into the prairie, half a day's march from the Mississippi; thence in a straight line to the mouth of the first river which enters the Mississippi on its west side above the mouth of Sac river; thence ascending the said river (above the mouth of Sac river) to a small lake at its source; thence in a direct line to a lake at the head of Prairie river, which is supposed to enter the Crow Wing river on its South side; thence to Otter-tail lake Portage; thence to said Otter tail lake, and down through the middle thereof, to its outlet; thence in a direct line, so as to strike Buffalo river, half way from its source to its mouth, and down the said river to Red River; thence descending Red river to the mouth of Outard or Goose creek: The eastern boundary of the Sioux commences opposite the mouth of Ioway river, on the Mississippi, runs back two or three miles to the bluffs, follows the bluffs, crossing Bad axe river, to the mouth of Black river, and from Black river to half a day's march below the Falls of the Chippewa River.


ARTICLE 6.

It is agreed between the Chippewas and Winnebagoes, so far as they are mutually interested therein, that the southern boundary line of the Chippewa country shall commence on the Chippewa river aforesaid, half a day's march below the falls on that river, and run thence to the source of Clear Water river, a branch of the Chippewa; thence south to Black river; thence to a point where the woods project into the meadows, and thence to the Plover Portage of the Ouisconsin.


ARTICLE 7.

It is agreed between the Winnebagoes and the Sioux, Sacs and Foxes, Chippewas and Ottawas, Chippewas and Potawatomies of the Illinois, that the Winnebago country shall be bounded as follows: south easterly by Rock River, from its source near the Winnebago lake, to the Winnebago village, about forty miles above its mouth; westerly by the east line of the tract, lying upon the Mississippi, herein secured to the Ottawa, Chippewa and Potawatomie Indians, of the Illinois; and also by the high bluff, described in the Sioux boundary, and running north to Black river: from this point the Winnebagoes claim up Black river, to a point due west from the source of the left fork of the Ouisconsin; thence to the source of the said fork, and down the same to the Ouisconsin; thence down the Ouisconsin to the portage, and across the portage to Fox river; thence down Fox river to the Winnebago lake, and to the grand Kan Kanlin, including in their claim the whole of Winnebago lake; but, for the causes stated in the next article, this line from Black river must for the present be left indeterminate.


ARTICLE 8.

The representatives of the Menominies not being sufficiently acquainted with their proper boundaries, to settle the same definitively, and some uncertainty existing in consequence of the cession made by that tribe upon Fox River and Green Bay, to the New York Indians, it is agreed between the said Menominie tribe, and the Sioux, Chippewas, Winnebagoes, Ottawa, Chippewa and Potawatomie Indians of the Illinois, that the claim of the Menominies to any portion of the land within the boundaries allotted to either of the said tribes, shall not be barred by any stipulation herein; but the same shall remain as valid as if this treaty had not been concluded. It is, however, understood that the general claim of the Menominies is bounded on the north by the Chippewa country, on the east by Green Bay and lake Michigan extending as far south as Millawaukee river, and on the West they claim to Black River.


ARTICLE 9.

The country secured to the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomie tribes of the Illinois, is bounded as follows: Beginning at the Winnebago village, on Rock river, forty miles from its mouth and running thence down the Rock river to a line which runs from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi, and with that line to the Mississippi, opposite to Rock Island; thence up that river to the United States reservation, at the mouth of the Ouisconsin; thence with the south and east lines of the said reservation to the Ouisconsin; thence, southerly, passing the heads of the small streams emptying into the Mississippi, to the Rock river at the Winnebago village. The Illinois Indians have also a just claim to a portion of the country bounded south by the Indian boundary line aforesaid, running from the southern extreme of lake Michigan, east by lake Michigan, north by the Menominie country, and north-west by Rock river. This claim is recognized in the treaty concluded with the said Illinois tribes at St. Louis, August 24, 1816, but as the Millewakee and Manctoowalk bands are not represented at this Council, it cannot be now definitively adjusted.


ARTICLE 10.

All the tribes aforesaid acknowledge the general controlling power of the United States, and disclaim all dependence upon, and connection with, any other power. And the United States agree to, and recognize, the preceding boundaries, subject to the limitations and restrictions before provided. It being, however, well understood that the reservations at Fever River, at the Ouisconsin, and St. Peters, and the ancient settlements at Prairie des Chiens and Green Bay, and the land property thereto belonging, and the reservations made upon the Mississippi, for the use of the half breeds, in the treaty concluded with the Sacs and Foxes, August 24, 1824, are not claimed by either of the said tribes.


ARTICLE 11.

The United States agree, whenever the President may think it necessary and proper, to convene such of the tribes, either separately or together, as are interested in the lines left unsettled herein, and to recommend to them an amicable and final adjustment of their respective claims, so that the work, now happily begun, may be consummated. It is agreed, however, that a Council shall be held with the Yancton band of the Sioux, during the year 1826, to explain to them the stipulations of this treaty, and to procure their assent thereto, should they be disposed to give it, and also with the Ottoes, to settle and adjust their title to any of the country claimed by the Sacs, Foxes, and Ioways.


ARTICLE 12.

The Chippewa tribe being dispersed over a great extent of country, and the Chiefs of that tribe having requested, that such portion of them as may be thought proper, by the Government of the United States, may be assembled in 1826, upon some part of Lake Superior, that the objects and advantages of this treaty may be fully explained to them, so that the stipulations thereof may be observed by the warriors. The Commissioners of the United States assent thereto, and it is therefore agreed that a council shall accordingly be held for these purposes.


ARTICLE 13.

It is understood by all the tribes, parties hereto, that no tribe shall hunt within the acknowledged limits of any other without their assent, but it being the sole object of this arrangement to perpetuate a peace among them, and amicable relations being now restored, the Chiefs of all the tribes have expressed a determination, cheerfully to allow a reciprocal right of hunting on the lands of one another, permission being first asked and obtained, as before provided for.


ARTICLE 14.

Should any causes of difficulty hereafter unhappily arise between any of the tribes, parties hereunto, it is agreed that the other tribes shall interpose their good offices to remove such difficulties; and also that the government of the United States may take such measures as they may deem proper, to effect the same object.


ARTICLE 15.

This treaty shall be obligatory on the tribes, parties hereto, from and after the date hereof, and on the United States, from and after its ratification by the government thereof.

Done, and signed, and scaled, at Prairie des Chiens, in the territory of Michigan, this nineteenth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five, and of the independence of the United States the fiftieth.

William Clark, [L. S.]
Lewis Cass, [L. S.]
Sioux:
Wa-ba-sha, x or the leaf, [L. S.]
Pe-tet-te x Corbeau, little crow, [L. S.]
The Little x of the Wappitong tribe, [L. S.]
Tartunka-nasiah x Sussitong, [L. S.]
Sleepy Eyes, x Sossitong, [L. S.]
Two faces x Sossitong, [L. S.]
French Crow x Wappacoota, [L. S.]
Kee-jec x Wappacoota, [L. S.]
Tar-se-ga x Wappacoota, [L. S.]
Wa-ma-de-tun-ka x black dog, [L. S.]
Wan-na-ta x Yancton, or he that charges on his enemies, [L. S.]
Red Wing x [L. S.]
Ko-ko-ma-ko x [L. S.]
Sha-co-pe x the Sixth, [L. S.]
Pe-ni-si-on x [L. S.]
Eta-see-pa x Wabasha's band, [L. S.]
Wa-ka-u-hee, x Sioux band, rising thunder, [L. S.]
The Little Crow, x Sussetong, [L. S.]
Po-e-ha-pa x Me-da-we-con-tong, or eagle head, [L. S.]
Ta-ke-wa-pa x Wappitong, or medicine blanket, [L. S.]
Tench-ze-part, x his bow, [L. S.]
Masc-pu-lo-chas-tosh, x the white man, [L. S.]
Te-te-kar-munch, x the buffalo man, [L. S.]
Wa-sa-o-ta x Sussetong, or a great of hail, [L. S.]
Oeyah-ko-ca, x the crackling tract, [L. S.]
Mak-to-wah-ke-ark, x the bear, [L. S.]
Winnebagoes:
Les quatres jambes, [L. S.]
x Carimine, x the turtle that walks, [L. S.]
De-ca-ri, [L. S.]
x Wan-ca-ha-ga, x or snake's skin, [L. S.]
Sa-sa-ma-ni, [L. S.]
x Wa-non-che-qua, x the merchant, [L. S.]
Chon-que-pa, x or dog's head, [L. S.]
Cha-rat-chon, x the smoker, [L. S.]
Ca-ri-ca-si-ca, x he that kills the crow Watch-kat-o-que, x the grand canoe, [L. S.]
Ho-wa-mick-a, x the little elk, [L. S.]
Men omi nees:
Ma-can-me-ta, x medicine bear, [L. S.]
Chau-wee-nou-mi-tai, x medicine south wind, [L. S.]
Char-o-nee, x [L. S.]
Ma-wesh-a, x the little wolf, [L. S.]
A-ya-pas-mis-ai, x the thunder that turns, [L. S.]
Cha-ne-pau, x the riband, [L. S.]
La-me-quon, x the spoon, [L. S.]
En-im-e-tas, x the barking wolf, [L. S.]
Pape-at, x the one just arrived, [L. S.]
O-que-men-ce, x the little chief, [L. S.]

Chippewas:
Shinguaba x W'Ossin, 1st chief of the Chippewa nation, Saulte St. Marie, [L. S.]
Gitspee x Jiauba, 2d chief, [L. S.]
Gitspee x Waskee, or le boeuf of la pointe lake Superior, [L. S.]
Nain-a-boozhu, x of lapointe lake Superior, [L. S.]
Monga, x Zid or loon's foot of Fond du Lac, [L. S.]
Weescoup, x or sucre of Fond du Lac, [L. S.]
Mush-Koas, x or the elk of Fond du Lac, [L. S.]
Nau-bun x Aqeezhik, of Fond du Lac, [L. S.]
Kau-ta-waubeta, x or broken tooth of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Pugisaingegen, x or broken arm of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Kwee-weezaishish, x or gross guelle of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Ba-ba-see-kundade, x or curling hair of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Paashineep, x or man shooting at the mark of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Pu-ga-a-gik, x the little beef, Leech lake, [L. S.]
Pee-see-ker, x or buffalo, St. Croix band, [L. S.]
Nau-din, x or the wind, St. Croix band, [L. S.]
Nau-quan-a-bee, x of Mille lac, [L. S.]
Tu-kau-bis-hoo, x or crouching lynx of Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
The Red Devil, x of Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
The Track, x of Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
Ne-bo-na-bee, x the mermaid Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
Pi-a-gick, x the single man St. Croix, [L. S.]
Pu-in-a-ne-gi, x, or the hole in the day, Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Moose-o-mon-e, x plenty of elk, St. Croix band, [L. S.]
Nees-o-pe-na, x or two birds of Upper Red Cedar lake, [L. S.]
Shaata, x the pelican of Leech lake, [L. S.]
Che-on-o-quet, x the great cloud of Leech lake, [L. S.]
I-au-ben-see, x the little buck of Red lake, [L. S.]
Kia-wa-tas, x the tarrier of Leech lake, [L. S.]
Mau-ge-ga-bo, x the leaderof Leech lake, [L. S.]
Nan-go-tuck, x the flame of Leech lake, [L. S.]
Nee-si-day-sish, x the sky of Red lake, [L. S.]
Pee-chan-a-nim, x striped feather of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
White Devil, x of Leech lake, [L. S.]
Ka-ha-ka, x the sparrow, Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
I-au-be-ence, x little buck of Rice lake, [L. S.]
Ca-ba-ma-bee, x the assembly of St. Croix, [L. S.]
Nau-gau-nosh, x the forward man lake Flambeau, [L. S.]
Caw-win-dow, x he that gathers berries of Sandy Lake, [L. S.]
On-que-ess, the mink, lake Superior, [L. S.]
Ke-we-ta-ke-pe, x all round the sky, [L. S.]
The-sees, x [L. S.]
Ottawas:
Chaboner, x or Chambly, [L. S.]
Shaw-fau-wick, x the mink, [L. S.]
Potawatomies:
Ignace, x [L. S.]
Ke-o-kuk, x [L. S.]
Che-chan-quose, x the little crane, [L. S.]
Taw-wa-na-nee, x the trader, [L. S.]

Sacs:
Na-o-tuk, x the stabbing chief, [L. S.]
Pish-ken-au-nee, x all fish, [L. S.]
Po-ko-nau-qua, x or broken arm, [L. S.]
Wau-kau-che, x eagle nose, [L. S.]
Quash-kaume, x jumping fish, [L. S.]
Ochaach, x the fisher, [L. S.]
Ke-o-kuck, x the watchful fox, [L. S.]
Skin-gwin-ee-see, the x ratler, [L. S.]
Was-ar-wis-ke-no, x the yellow bird, [L. S.]
Pau-ko-tuk, x the open sky, [L. S.]
Au-kaak-wan-e-suk, x he that vaults on the earth, [L. S.]
Mu-ku-taak-wan-wet, x[L. S.]
Mis-ke-bee, x the standing hair, [L. S.]

Foxes:
Wan-ba-law, x the playing fox, [L. S.]
Ti-a-mah, x the bear that makes the rocks shake, [L. S.]
Pee-ar-maski, x the jumping sturgeon, [L. S.]
Shagwa-na-tekwishu, x the thunder that is heard all over the world, [L. S.]
Mis-o-win, x moose deer horn, [L. S.]
No-ko-wot, x the down of the fur, [L. S.]
Nau-sa-wa-quot, x the bear that sleeps on the forks, [L. S.]
Shin-quirt-is, x the ratler, [L. S.]
O-lo-pee-aau, x or Mache-paho-ta, [L. S.]
the bear, [L. S.]
Keesis, x the sun, [L. S.]
No-wank, x he that gives too little, [L. S.]
Kan-ka-mote, x [L. S.]
Neck-wad, x [L. S.]
Ka-tuck-e-kan-ka, x the fox with a spotted breast, [L. S.]
Mock-to-back-sa-gum, x black tobacco, [L. S.]
Wes-kesa, x the bear family, [L. S.]

Ioways:
Ma-hos-ka, x the white cloud, [L. S.]
Pumpkin, x [L. S.]
Wa-ca-nee, x the painted medicine, [L. S.]
Tar-no-mun, x a great many deer, [L. S.]
Wa-hoo-ga, x the owl, [L. S.]
Ta-ca-mo-nee, x the lightning, [L. S.]
Wa-push-a, x the man killer, [L. S.]
To-nup-he-non-e, x the flea, [L. S.]
Mon-da-tonga, x [L. S.]
Cho-wa-row-a, x [L. S.]


Witnesses:

Thomas Biddie, secretary,
R. A. McCabe, Captain Fifth Infantry,
R. A. Forsyth,
N. Boilvin, United States Indian agent,
C. C. Trowbridge, sub Indian agent,
Henry R. SchoolCraft, United States Indian agent,
B. F. Harney, Surgeon U. S. Army,
W. B. Alexander, sub Indian agent,
Thomas Forsyth, agent Indian affairs,
Marvien Blondau,
David Bailey,
James M'Ilvaine, lieutenant U. S. Army,
Law. Taliaferro, Indian agent for Upper Mississippi,
John Holiday,
William Dickson,
S. Campbell, United States interpreter,
J. A. Lewis,
William Holiday,
Dunable Denejlevy,
Bela Chapman.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:17 pm 
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 464
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
TREATY WITH THE SIOUX
Sept. 29, 1837
Proclamation, June 15, 1838.
7 Stat., 538

Articles of a treaty, made at the City of Washington, between Joel R. Poinsett, thereto specially authorized by the President of the United States, and certain chiefs and braves of the Sioux nation of Indians.

ARTICLE 1st. The chiefs and braves representing the parties having an interest therein, cede to the United States all their land, east of the Mississippi river, and all their islands in the said river.

ARTICLE 2nd. In consideration of the cession contained in the preceding article, the United States agree to the following stipulations on their part.

First. To invest the sum of $300,000 (three hundred thousand dollars) in such safe and profitable State stocks as the President may direct, and to pay to the chiefs and braves as aforesaid, annually, forever, an income of not less than five per cent. thereon; a portion of said interest, not exceeding one third, to be applied in such manner as the President may direct, and the residue to be paid in specie, or in such other manner, and for such objects, as the proper authorities of the tribe may designate.

Second. To pay to the relatives and friends of the chiefs and braves, as aforesaid, having not less than one quarter of Sioux blood, $110,000 (one hundred and ten thousand dollars) to be distributed by the proper authorities of the tribe, upon principles to be determined by the chiefs and braves signing this treaty, and the War Department.

Third. To apply the sum of $90,000 (ninety thousand dollars)to the payment of Just debts of the Sioux Indians, interested in the lands herewith ceded.

Fourth. To pay to the chiefs and braves as aforesaid an annuity for twenty years of $10,000 (ten thousand dollars)in goods, to be purchased under the direction of the President, and delivered at the expense of the United States.

Fifth. To expend annually for twenty years, for the benefit of Sioux Indians, parties to this treaty, the sum of $8,250 (eight thousand two hundred and fifty dollars) in the purchase of medicines, agricultural implements and stock, and for the support of a physician, farmers, and blacksmiths, and for other beneficial objects.

Sixth. In order to enable the Indians aforesaid to break up and improve their lands, the United States will supply, as soon as practicable, after the ratification of this treaty, agricultural implements, mechanics' tools, cattle, and such other articles as may be useful to them, to an amount not exceeding $10,000, (ten thousand dollars.)

Seventh. To expend annually, for twenty years, the sum of $5.500 (five thousand five hundred dollars) in the, purchase of provisions, to be delivered at the expense of the United States.

Eighth. To deliver to the chiefs and braves signing this treaty, upon their arrival at St. Louis, $6,000 (six thousand dollars) in goods.

ARTICLE 3rd. (Stricken out by Senate.)

ARTICLE 4th. This treaty shall be binding on the contracting parties as soda as it shall be ratified by the United States.

In testimony whereof, the said Joel R. Poinsett, and the undersigned chiefs and braves of the Sioux nation, have hereunto set their hands, at the City of Washington, this 29th day of September A. D. 1837.

J. R. Poinsett.

Medawakantons:
Tah-tape-saah, The Upsetting Wind,
Wah-keah-tun-kah, Big Thunder,
Mah-zah-hoh-tah, Grey Iron,
Tautunga-munne, Walking Buffalo,
Eu-hah-kaakow, He that comes last,
Mah-kuah-pah, he that shakes the Earth,
Tah-mah-zah-hoh-wash-taa, The Iron of handsome voice,
Watt-chu-dah, The Dancer,
Mah-zah-tunkah, The Big Iron,
Mau-po-koah-munnee, He that runs after the clouds,
Tah-chunk-wash-taa, Good Road,
Mare-pu-ah-nasiah, Standing Cloud,
Koi-moko, Afloat,
Mau-pu-wee-chastah, White Man,
Mau-pu-ah-mah-zah, Iron Cloud,
Tah-chunek-oh-dutah, The Red Road,
Wasson-wee-chastish-nee, The Bad Hail,
Hoe-yah-pah, the Eagle Head Annon-ge-nasiah,
He that Stands on Both sides,
Chaudus-ka-mumee, the Walking Circle,
Tee-oh-du-tah, the Red Lodge.

In presence of--

Chauncy Bush, secretary.
Mahlon Dickerson, Secretary of the Navy.
W. J. Worth, lieutenant-colonel.
Geo. W. Jones, of Wisconsin.Law.
Taliaferro, U. S. agent at St. Peters.
Wm. Hawley.
C. A. Harris, Commissioner of Indian Affairs.
S. Cooper, chief clerk War Department.
D. Kurtz, chief clerk Indian Office.
Charles Calvert.
S. Campbell, interpreter.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:18 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
TREATY OF FORT LARAMIE
September 17, 1851

11 Stat., p. 749.

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Fort Laramie, in the Indian Territory, between D. D. Mitchell, superintendent of Indian affairs, and Thomas Fitzpatrick, Indian agent, commissioners specially appointed and authorized by the President of the United States, of the first part, and the chiefs, headmen, and braves of the following Indian nations, residing south of the Missouri River, east of the Rocky Mountains, and north of the lines of Texas and New Mexico, viz, the Sioux or Dahcotahs, Cheyennes, Arrapahoes, Crows, Assinaboines, Gros-Ventre Mandans, and Arrickaras, parties of the second part, on the seventeenth day of September, A.D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one.a

ARTICLE 1. The aforesaid nations, parties to this treaty, having assembled for the purpose of establishing and confirming peaceful relations amongst themselves, do hereby covenant and agree to abstain in future from all hostilities whatever against each other, to maintain good faith and friendship in all their mutual intercourse, and to make an effective and lasting peace.

ARTICLE 2. The aforesaid nations do hereby recognize the right of the United States Government to establish roads, military and other posts, within their respective territories.

ARTICLE 3. In consideration of the rights and privileges acknowledged in the preceding article, the United States bind themselves to protect the aforesaid Indian nations against the commission of all depredations by the people of the said United States, after the ratification of this treaty.

ARTICLE 4. The aforesaid Indian nations do hereby agree and bind themselves to make restitution or satisfaction for any wrongs committed, after the ratification of this treaty, by any band or individual of their people, on the people of the United States, whilst lawfully residing in or passing through their respective territories.

ARTICLE 5. The aforesaid Indian nations do hereby recognize and acknowledge the following tracts of country, included within the metes and boundaries hereinafter designated, as their respective territories, viz;

The territory of the Sioux or Dahcotah Nation, commencing the mouth of the White Earth River, on the Missouri River; thence in a southwesterly direction to the forks of the Platte River; thence up the north fork of the Platte River to a point known as the Red Buts, or where the road leaves the river; thence along the range of mountains known as the Black Hills, to the head-waters of Heart River; thence down Heart River to its mouth; and thence down the Missouri River to the place of beginning.

The territory of the Gros Ventre, Mandans, and Arrickaras Nations, commencing at the month of Heart River; thence up the Missouri River to the mouth of the Yellowstone River; thence up the Yellowstone River to the mouth of Powder River in a southeasterly direction, to the head-waters of the Little Missouri River; thence along the Black Hills to the head of Heart River, and thence down Heart River to the place of beginning.

The territory of the Assinaboin Nation, commencing at the mouth of Yellowstone River; thence up the Missouri River to the mouth of the Muscle-shell River; thence from the mouth of the Muscle-shell River in a southeasterly direction until it strikes the head-waters of Big Dry Creek; thence down that creek to where it empties into the Yellowstone River, nearly opposite the mouth of Powder River, and thence down the Yellowstone River to the place of beginning.

The territory of the Blackfoot Nation, commencing at the mouth of Muscle-shell River; thence up the Missouri River to its source; thence along the main range of the Rocky Mountains, in a southerly direction, to the head-waters of the northern source of the Yellowstone River; thence down the Yellowstone River to the mouth of Twenty-five Yard Creek; thence across to the head-waters of the Muscle-shell River, and thence down the Muscle-shell River to the place of beginning.

The territory of the Crow Nation, commencing at the mouth of Powder River on the Yellowstone; thence up Powder River to its source; thence along the main range of the Black Hills and Wind River Mountains to the head-waters of the Yellowstone River; thence down the Yellowstone River to the mouth of Twenty-five Yard Creek; thence to the head waters of the Muscle-shell River; thence down the Muscle-shell River to its mouth; thence to the head-waters of Big Dry Creek, and thence to its mouth.

The territory of the Cheyennes and Arrapahoes, commencing at the Red Bute, or the place where the road leaves the north fork of the Platte River; thence up the north fork of the Platte River to its source; thence along the main range of the Rocky Mountains to the head-waters of the Arkansas River; thence down the Arkansas River to the crossing of the Santa Fe' road; thence in a northwesterly direction to the forks of the Platte River, and thence up the Platte River to the place of beginning.

It is, however, understood that, in making this recognition and acknowledgement, the aforesaid Indian nations do not hereby abandon or prejudice any rights or claims they may have to other lands; and further, that they do not surrender the privilege of hunting, fishing, or passing over any of the tracts of country heretofore described.

ARTICLE 6. The parties to the second part of this treaty having selected principals or head-chiefs for their respective nations, through whom all national business will hereafter be conducted, do hereby bind themselves to sustain said chiefs and their successors during good behavior.

ARTICLE 7. In consideration of the treaty stipulations, and for the damages which have or may occur by reason thereof to the Indian nations, parties hereto, and for their maintenance and the improvement of their moral and social customs, the United States bind themselves to deliver to the said Indian nations the sum of fifty thousand dollars per annum for the term of ten years, with the right to continue the same at the discretion of the President of the United States for a period not exceeding five years thereafter, in provisions merchandise, domestic animals, and agricultural implements, in such proportions as may be deemed best adapted to their condition by the President of the United States, to be distributed in proportion to the population of the aforesaid Indian nations.

ARTICLE 8. It is understood and agreed that should any of the Indian nations, parties to this treaty, violate any of the provisions thereof, the United States may withhold the whole or a portion of the annuities mentioned in the preceding article from the nation so offending, until, in the opinion of the President of the United States, proper satisfaction shall have been made.

In testimony whereof the said D. D. Mitchell and Thomas Fitzpatrick commissioners as aforesaid, and the chiefs, headmen, and braves, parties hereto, have set their hands and affixed their marks, on the day and at the place first above written.

D. D. Mitchell
Thomas Fitzpatrick
Commissioners.

Sioux:
Mah-toe-wha-you-whey, his x mark,
Mah-kah-toe-zah-zah, his x mark,
Bel-o-ton-kah-tan-ga, his x mark,
Nah-ka-pah-gi-gi, his x mark,
Mak-toe-sah-bi-chis, his x mark,
Meh-wha-tah-ni-hans-kah, his x mark,
Cheyennes:
Wah-ha-nis-satta, his x mark,
Voist-ti-toe-vetz, his x mark,
Nahk-ko-me-ien, his x mark,
Koh-kah-y-wh-cum-est, his x mark,
Arrapahoes:
Bè-ah-té-a-qui-sah, his x mark,
Neb-ni-bah-seh-it, his x mark,
Beh-kah-jay-beth-sah-es, his x mark,
Crows:

Arra-tu-ri-sash, his x mark,
Doh-chepit-seh-chi-es, his x mark,
Assinaboines:
Mah-toe-wit-ko, his x mark,
Toe-tah-ki-eh-nan, his x mark,
Mandans and Gros Ventres:
Nochk-pit-shi-toe-pish, his x mark,
She-oh-mant-ho, his x mark,
Arickarees:
Koun-hei-ti-shan, his x mark,
Bi-atch-tah-wetch, his x mark,


In the presence of---

A. B. Chambers, secretary.
S. Cooper, colonel, U. S. Army.
R. H. Chilton, captain, First Drags.
Thomas Duncan, captain, Mounted Rifiemen.
Thos. G. Rhett, brevet captain R. M. R.
W. L. Elliott, first lieutenant R. M. R.
C. Campbell, interpreter for Sioux.
John S. Smith, interpreter for Cheyennes.
Robert Meldrum, interpreter for the Crows.
H. Culbertson, interpreter for Assiniboines and Gros Ventres.
Francois L'Etalie, interpreter for Arickarees.
John Pizelle, interpreter for the Arrapahoes.
B. Gratz Brown.
Robert Campbell.
Edmond F. Chouteau.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(a) This treaty as signed was ratified by the Senate with an amendment changing the annuity in Article 7 from fifty to ten years, subject to acceptance by the tribes. Assent of all tribes except the Crows was procured (see Upper Platte C., 570, 1853, Indian Office) and in subsequent agreements this treaty has been recognized as in force (see post p. 776).

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:19 pm 
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Posts: 464
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
FORT LARAMIE TREATY
APRIL 29, 1868
TREATY WITH THE SIOUX-- BRULÉ, OGLALA, MINICONJOU, YANKTONAI, HUNKPAPA, BLACKFEET, CUTHEAD, TWO KETTLE, SANS ARCS, AND SANTEE--AND ARAPAHO

15 Stat., 635.
Ratified, Feb. 16, 1869.
Proclaimed, Feb. 24, 1869

Articles of a treaty made and concluded by and between Lieutenant-General William T. Sherman, General William S. Harney, General Alfred H. Terry, General C. C,. Augur, J. B. Henderson, Nathaniel G. Taylor, John B. Sanborn, and Samuel F. Tappan, duly appointed commissioners on the part of the United States, and the different bands of the Sioux Nation of Indians, by their chiefs and head-men, whose names are hereto subscribed, they being duly authorized to act in the premises.

ARTICLE 1. From this day forward all war between the parties to this agreement shall forever cease. The Government of the United States desires peace, and its honor is hereby pledged to keep it. The Indians desire peace, and they now pledge their honor to maintain it.

If bad men among the whites, or among other people subject to the authority of the United States, shall commit any wrong upon the person or property of the Indians, the United States will, upon proof made to the agent and forwarded to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs at Washington City, proceed at once to cause the offender to be arrested and punished according to the laws of the United States, and also re-imburse the injured person for the loss sustained.

If bad men among the Indians shall commit a wrong or depredation upon the person or property of any one, white, black, or Indian, subject to the authority of the United States, and at peace therewith, the Indians herein named solemnly agree that they will, upon proof made to their agent and notice by him, deliver up the wrong-doer to the United States, to be tried and punished according to its laws; and in case they wilfully refuse so to do, the person injured shall be re-imbursed for his loss from the annuities or other moneys due or to become due to them under this or other treaties made with the United States. And the President, on advising with the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, shall prescribe such rules and regulations for ascertaining damages under the provisions of this article as in his judgment may be proper. But no one sustaining loss while violating the provisions of this treaty or the laws of the United States shall be re-imbursed therefor.

ARTICLE 2. The United States agrees that the following district of country, to wit, viz: commencing on the east bank of the Missouri River where the forty-sixth parallel of north latitude crosses the same, thence along low-water mark down said east bank to a point opposite where the northern line of the State of Nebraska strikes the river, thence west across said river, and along the northern line of Nebraska to the one hundred and fourth degree of longitude west from Greenwich, thence north on said meridian to a point where the forty-sixth parallel of north latitude intercepts the same, thence due east along said parallel to the place of beginning; and in addition thereto, all existing reservations on the east bank of said river shall be, and the same is, set apart for the absolute and undisturbed use and occupation of the Indians herein named, and for such other friendly tribes or individual Indians as from time to time they may be willing, with the consent of the United States, to admit amongst them; and the United States now solemnly agrees that no persons except those herein designated and authorized so to do, and except such officers, agents, and employes of the Government as may be authorized to enter upon Indian reservations in discharge of duties enjoined by law, shall ever be permitted to pass over, settle upon, or reside in the territory described in this article, or in such territory as may be added to this reservation for the use of said Indians, and henceforth they will and do hereby relinquish all claims or right in and to any portion of the United States or Territories, except such as is embraced within the limits aforesaid, and except as hereinafter provided.

ARTICLE 3. If it should appear from actual survey or other satisfactory examination of said tract of land that it contains less than one hundred and sixty acres of tillable land for each person who, at the time, may be authorized to reside on it under the provisions of this treaty, and a very considerable number of such persons shall be disposed to commence cultivating the soil as farmers, the United States agrees to set apart, for the use of said Indians, as herein provided, such additional quantity of arable land, adjoining to said reservation, or as near to the same as it can be obtained, as may be required to provide the necessary amount.

ARTICLE 4. The United States agrees, at its own proper expense, to construct at some place on the Missouri River, near the center of said reservation, where timber and water may be convenient, the following buildings, to wit: a warehouse, a store-room for the use of the agent in storing goods belonging to the Indians, to cost not less than twenty-five hundred dollars; an agency-building for the residence of the agent, to cost not exceeding three thousand dollars; a residence for the physician, to cost not more than three thousand dollars; and five other buildings, for a carpenter, farmer, blacksmith, miller, and engineer, each to cost not exceeding two thousand dollars; also a schoolhouse or mission-building, so soon as a sufficient number of children can be induced by the agent to attend school, which shall not cost exceeding five thousand dollars.

The United States agrees further to cause to be erected on said reservation, near the other buildings herein authorized, a good steam circular-saw mill, with a grist-mill and shingle-machine attached to the same, to cost not exceeding eight thousand dollars.

ARTICLE 5. The United States agrees that the agent for said Indians shall in the future make his home at the agency-building; that he shall reside among them, and keep an office open at all times for the purpose of prompt and diligent inquiry into such matters of complaint by and against the Indians as may be presented for investigation under the provisions of their treaty stipulations, as also for the faithful discharge of other duties enjoined on him by law. In all cases of depredation on person or property he shall cause the evidence to be taken in writing and forwarded, together with his findings, to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, whose decision, subject to the revision of the Secretary of the Interior, shall be binding on the parties to this treaty.

ARTICLE 6. if any individual belonging to said tribes of Indians, or legally incorporated with them, being the head of a family, shall desire to commence farming, he shall have the privilege to select, in the presence and with the assistance of the agent then in charge, a tract of land within said reservation, not exceeding three hundred and twenty acres in extent, which tract, when so selected, certified, and recorded in the "land-book," as herein directed, shall cease to be held in common, but the same may be occupied and held in the exclusive possession of the person selecting it, and of his family, so long as he or they may continue to cultivate it.

Any person over eighteen years of age, not being the head of a family, may in like manner select and cause to be certified to him or her, for purposes of cultivation, a quantity of land not exceeding eighty acres in extent, and thereupon be entitled to the exclusive possession of the same as above directed.

For each tract of land so selected a certificate, containing a description thereof and the name of the person selecting it, with a certificate endorsed thereon that the same has been recorded, shall be delivered to the party entitled to it, by the agent, after the same shall have been recorded by him in a book to be kept in his office, subject to inspection, which said book shall be known as the "Sioux Land-Book."

The President may, at any time, order a survey of the reservation, and, when so surveyed, Congress shall provide for protecting the rights of said settlers in their improvements, and may fix the character of the title held by each. The United States may pass such laws on the subject of alienation and descent of property between the Indians and their descendants as may be thought proper. And it is further stipulated that any male Indians, over eighteen years of age, of any band or tribe that is or shall hereafter become a party to this treaty, who now is or who shall hereafter become a resident or occupant of any reservation or Territory not included in the tract of country designated and described in this treaty for the permanent home of the Indians, which is not mineral land, nor reserved by the United States for special purposes other than Indian occupation, and who shall have made improvements thereon of the value of two hundred dollars or more, and continuously occupied the same as a homestead for the term of three years, shall be entitled to receive from the United States a patent for one hundred and sixty acres of land including his said improve-meats, the same to be in the form of the legal subdivisions of the surveys of the public lands. Upon application in writing, sustained by the proof of two disinterested witnesses, made to the register of the local land-office when the land sought to be entered is within a land district, and when the tract sought to be entered is not in any land district, then upon said application and proof being made to the Commissioner of the General Land-Office, and the right of such Indian or Indians to enter such tract or tracts of land shall accrue and be perfect from the date of his first improvements thereon, and shall continue as long as he continues his residence and improvements, and no longer'. And any Indian or Indians receiving a patent for land under the foregoing provisions, shall thereby and from thenceforth become and be a citizen of the United States, and be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of such citizens, and shall, at the same time, retain all his rights to benefits accruing to Indians under this treaty.

ARTICLE 7. In order to insure the civilization of the Indians entering into this treaty, the necessity of education is admitted, especially of such of them as are or may be settled on said agricultural reservations, and they therefore pledge themselves to compel their children, male and female, between the ages of six and sixteen years, to attend school; and it is hereby made the duty of the agent for said Indians to see that this stipulation is strictly complied with; and the United States agrees that for every thirty children between said ages who can be induced or compelled to attend school, a house shall be provided and a teacher competent to teach the elementary branches of an English education shall be furnished, who will reside among said Indians, and faithfully discharge his or her duties as a teacher. The provisions of this article to continue for not less than twenty years.

ARTICLE 8. When the head of a family or lodge shall have selected lands and received his certificate as above directed, and the agent shall be satisfied that he intends in good faith to commence cultivating the soil for a living, he shall be entitled to receive seeds and agricultural implements for the first year, not exceeding in value one hundred dollars, and for each succeeding year he shall continue to farm, for a period of three years more, he shall be entitled to receive seeds and implements as aforesaid, not exceeding in value twenty-five dollars.

And it is further stipulated that such persons as commence farming shall receive instruction from the farmer herein provided for, and whenever more than one hundred persons shall enter upon the cultivation of the soil, a second blacksmith shall be provided, with such iron, steel, and other material as may be needed.

ARTICLE 9. At any time after ten years from the making of this treaty, the United States shall have the privilege of withdrawing the physician, farmer, blacksmith, carpenter, engineer, and miller herein provided for, but in case of such withdrawal, an additional sum thereafter of ten thousand dollars per annum shall be devoted to the education of said Indians, and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs shall, upon careful inquiry into their condition, make such rules and regulations for the expenditure of said sum as will best promote the educational and moral improvement of said tribes.

ARTICLE 10. In lieu of all sums of money or other annuities provided to be paid to the Indians herein named, under any treaty or treaties heretofore made, the United States agrees to deliver at the agency-house on the reservation herein named, on or before the first day of August of each year, for thirty years, the following articles, to wit:

For each male person over fourteen years of age, a suit of good substantial woolen clothing, consisting of coat, pantaloons, flannel shirt, hat, and a pair of home-made socks.

For each female over twelve years of age, a flannel skirt, or the goods necessary to make it, a pair of woolen hose, twelve yards of calico, and twelve yards of cotton domestics.

For the boys and girls under the ages named, such flannel and cotton goods as may be needed to make each a suit as aforesaid, together with a pair of woolen hose for each.

And in order that the Commissioner of Indian Affairs may be able to estimate properly for the articles herein named, it shall be the duty of the agent each year to forward to him a full and exact census of the Indians, on which the estimate from year to year can be based.

And in addition to the clothing herein named, the sum of ten dollars for each person entitled to the beneficial effects of this treaty shall be annually appropriated for a period of thirty years, while such persons roam and hunt, and twenty dollars for, each person who engages in farming, to be used by the Secretary of the Interior in the purchase of such articles as from time to time the condition and necessities of the Indians may indicate to be proper. And if within the thirty years, at any time, it shall appear that the amount of money needed for clothing under this article can be appropriated to better uses for the Indians named herein, Congress may, by law, change the appropriation to other purposes; but in no event shall the amount of this appropriation be withdrawn or discontinued for the period named. And the President shall annually detail an officer of the Army to be present and attest the delivery of all the goods herein named to the Indians, and he shall inspect and report on the quantity and quality of the goods and the manner of their delivery. And it is hereby expressly stipulated that each Indian over the age of four years, who shall have removed to and settled permanently upon said reservation and complied with the stipulations of this treaty, shall be entitled to receive from the United States, for the period of four years after he shall have settled upon said reservation, one pound of meat and one pound of flour per day, provided the Indians cannot furnish their own subsistence at an earlier date. And it is further stipulated that the United States will furnish and deliver to each lodge of Indians or family of persons legally incorporated with them, who shall remove to the reservation herein described and commence farming, one good American cow, and one good well-broken pair of American oxen within sixty days after such lodge or family shall have so settled upon said reservation.

ARTICLE 11. In consideration of the advantages and benefits conferred by this treaty, and the many pledges of friendship by the United States, the tribes who are parties to this agreement hereby stipulate that they will relinquish all right to occupy permanently the territory outside their reservation as herein defined, but yet reserve the right to hunt on any lands north of North Platte, and on the Republican Fork of the Smoky Hill River, so long as the buffalo may range thereon in such numbers as to justify the chase. And they, the said Indians, further expressly agree:

1st. That they will withdraw all opposition to the construction of the railroads now being built on the plains.

2d. That they will permit the peaceful construction of any railroad not passing over their reservation as herein defined.

3d. That they will not attack any persons at home, or travelling, nor molest or disturb any wagon-trains, coaches, mules, or cattle belonging to the people of the United States, or to persons friendly therewith.

4th. They will never capture, or carry off from the settlements, white women or children.

5th. They will never kill or scalp white men, nor attempt to do them harm.

6th. They withdraw all pretence of opposition to the construction of the railroad now being built along the Platte River and westward to the Pacific Ocean, and they will not in future object to the construction of railroads, wagon-roads, mail-stations, or other works of utility or necessity, which may be ordered or permitted by the laws of the United States. But should such roads or other works be constructed on the lands of their reservation, the Government will pay the tribe whatever amount of damage may be assessed by three disinterested commissioners to be appointed by the President for that purpose, one of said commissioners to be a chief or head-man of the tribe.

7th. They agree to withdraw all opposition to the military posts or roads now established south of the North Platte River, or that may be established, not in violation of treaties heretofore made or hereafter to be made with any of the Indian tribes.

ARTICLE 12. No treaty for the cession of any portion or part of the reservation herein described which may be held in common shall be of any validity or force as against the said Indians, unless executed and signed by at least three-fourths of all the adult male Indians, occupying or interested in the same; and no cession by the tribe shall be understood or construed in such manner as to deprive, without his consent, any individual member of the tribe of his rights to any tract of land selected by him, as provided in article 6 of this treaty.

ARTICLE 13. The United States hereby agrees to furnish annually to the Indians the physician, teachers, carpenter, miller, engineer, farmer, and blacksmiths as herein contemplated, and that such appropriations shall be made from time to time, on the estimates of the Secretary of the Interior, as will be sufficient to employ such persons.

ARTICLE 14. it is agreed that the sum of five hundred dollars annually, for three years from date, shall be expended in presents to the ten persons of said tribe who in the judgment of the agent may grow the most valuable crops for the respective year.

ARTICLE 15. The Indians herein named agree that when the agency-house or other buildings shall be constructed on the reservation named, they will regard said reservation their permanent home, and they will make no permanent settlement elsewhere; but they shall have the right, subject to the conditions and modifications of this treaty, to hunt, as stipulated in Article 11 hereof.

ARTICLE 16. The United States hereby agrees and stipulates that the country north of the North Platte River and east of the summits of the Big Horn Mountains shall be held and considered to be unceded Indian territory, and also stipulates and agrees that no white person or persons shall be permitted to settle upon or occupy any portion of the same; or without the consent of the Indians first had and obtained, to pass through the same; and it is further agreed by the United States that within ninety days after the conclusion of peace with all the bands of the Sioux Nation, the military posts now established in the territory in this article named shall be abandoned, and that the road leading to them and by them to the settlements in the Territory of Montana shall be closed.

ARTICLE 17. It is hereby expressly understood and agreed by and between the respective parties to this treaty that the execution of this treaty and its ratification by the United States Senate shall have the effect, and shall be construed as abrogating and annulling all treaties and agreements heretofore entered into between the respective parties hereto, so far as such treaties and agreements obligate the United States to furnish and provide money, clothing, or other articles of property to such Indians and bands of Indians as become parties to this treaty, but no further.

In testimony of all which, we, the said commissioners, and we, the chiefs and headmen of the Brulé' band of the Sioux nation, have hereunto set our hands and seals at Fort Laramie, Dakota Territory, this twenty-ninth day of April, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight.

N. G. Taylor, [SEAL]
W. T. Sherman, [SEAL]
Lieutenant-General.
Wm. S. Harney, [SEAL]
Brevet Major-General U. S. Army.
John B. Sanborn, [SEAL]
S. F. Tappan, [SEAL]
C. C. Augur, [SEAL]
Brevet Major-General.
Alfred H. Terry, [SEAL]
Brevet Major-General U. S. Army.


Attest:
A. S. H. White, Secretary.


Executed on the part of the Brulé band of Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto annexed, they being thereunto duly authorized, at Fort Laramie, D. T., the twenty-ninth day of April, in the year A. D. 1868.

Ma-za-pon-kaska, his x mark, Iron Shell. [SEAL]
Wah-pat-shah, his x mark, Red Leaf. [SEAL]
Hah-sah-pah, his x mark, Black Horn. [SEAL]
Zin-tah-gah-lat-skah, his x mark, Spotted Tail. [SEAL]
Zin-tah-skah, his x mark, White Tail. [SEAL]
Me-wah-tah-ne-ho-skah, his x mark, Tall Mandas. [SEAL]
She-cha-chat-kah, his x mark, Bad Left Hand. [SEAL]
No-mah-no-pah, his x mark, Two and Two. [SEAL]
Tah-tonka-skah, his x mark, White Bull. [SEAL]
Con-ra-washta, his x mark, Pretty Coon. [SEAL]
Ha-cah-cah-she-chah, his x mark, Bad Elk. [SEAL]
Wa-ha-ka-zah-ish-tah, his x mark, Eye Lance. [SEAL]
Ma-to-ha-ke-tah, his x mark, Bear that looks behind. [SEAL]
Bella-tonka-tonka, his x mark, Big Partisan. [SEAL]
Mah-to-ho-honka, his x mark, Swift Bear. [SEAL]
To-wis-ne, his x mark, Cold Place. [SEAL]
Ish-tah-skah, his x mark, White Eyes. [SEAL]
Ma-ta-loo-zah, his x mark, Fast Bear. [SEAL]
As-hah-kah-nah-zhe, his x mark, Standing Elk. [SEAL]
Can-te-te-ki-ya, his x mark, The Brave Heart. [SEAL]
Shunka-shaton, his x mark, Day Hawk. [SEAL]
Tatanka-wakon, his Sacred Bull. [SEAL]
Mapia shaton, his x mark, Hawk Cloud. [SEAL]
Ma-sba-a-ow, his x mark, Stands and Comes. [SEAL]
Shon-ka-ton-ka, his x mark, Big Dog. [SEAL]


Attest:
Ashton S. H. White, secretary of commission.
George B. Withs, phonographer to commission.
Geo. H. Holtzman.
John D. Howlana.
James C. O'Connor.
Chas. E. Guern, interpreter.
Leon F. Pallardy, interpreter.
Nicholas Janis, interpreter.


Executed on the part of the Ogallalah band of Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto duly authorized, at Fort Laramie, the twenty-fifth day of May, in the year A. D. 1868.

Tah-shun-ka-co-qui-pah, his x mark, Man-afraid-of-his-horses. [SEAL]
Sha-ton-skah, his x mark, White Hawk. [SEAL]
Sha-ton-sapah, his x mark, Black Hawk. [SEAL]
E-ga-mon-ton-ka-sapah, his x mark, Black Tiger. [SEAL]
Oh-wah-she-cha, his x mark, Bad Wound. [SEAL]
Pah-gee, his x mark, Grass. [SEAL]
Wah-non-reh-che-geh, his x mark, Ghost Heart. [SEAL]
Con-reeh, his x mark, Crow. [SEAL]
Oh-he-te-kah, his x mark,The Brave. [SEAL]
Tah-ton-kah-he-yo-ta-kah, his x mark, Sitting Bull. [SEAL]
Shon-ka-oh-wah-mon-ye, his x mark, Whirlwind Dog. [SEAL]
Ha-hah-kah-tah-mieeh, his x mark, Poor Elk. [SEAL]
Wam-bu-lee-wah-kon, his x mark, Medicine Eagle. [SEAL]
Chon-gah-ma-he-to-hans-ka, his x mark, High Wolf. [SEAL]
Wah-se-chun-ta-sbun-kah, his x mark, American Horse. [SEAL]
Mah-hah-mah-ha-mak-near, his x mark, Man that walks under the ground. [SEAL]
Mah-to-tow-pah, his x mark, Four Bears. [SEAL]
Ma-to-wee-sha-kta, his x mark, One that kills the bear. [SEAL]
Oh-tah-kee-toka-wee-chakta, his x mark, One that kills in a hard place. [SEAL]
Tah-ton-kah-ta-mieeh, his x mark, The poor Bull. [SEAL]
Oh-huns-ee-ga-non-sken, his x mark, Mad Shade. [SEAL]
Shah-ton-oh-nah-om-minne-ne-oh-minne, his x mark, Whirl ing Hawk. [SEAL]
Mah-to-ehun-ka-oh, his x mark, Bear's Back. [SEAL]
Che-ton-wee-koh, his x mark, Fool Hawk. [SEAL]
Wah-hoh-ke-za-ah-hah, his x mark, One that has the lance. [SEAL]
Shon-gah-manni-toh-tan-ka-seh, his x mark, Big Wolf Foot. [SEAL]
Eh-ton-kah, his x mark,Big Mouth. [SEAL]
Ma-pah-che-tah, his x mark, Bad Hand. [SEAL]
Wah-ke-yun-shah, his x mark, Red Thunder. [SEAL]
Wak-sah, his x mark, One that Cuts Off. [SEAL]
Cham-nom-qui-yah, his x mark, One that Presents the Pipe. [SEAL]
Wah-ke-ke-yan-puh-tah, his x mark, Fire Thunder. [SEAL]
Mah-to-nonk-pah-ze, his x mark, Bear with Yellow Ears. [SEAL]
Con-ree-teh-ka, his x mark, The Little Crow. [SEAL]
He-hup-pah-toh, his x mark, The Blue War Club. [SEAL]
Shon-kee-toh, his x mark, The Blue Horse. [SEAL]
Wam-Balla-oh-con-quo, his x mark, Quick Eagle. [SEAL]
Ta-tonka-suppa, his x mark, Black Bull. [SEAL]
Moh-to-ha-she-na, his x mark, The Bear Hide. [SEAL]


Attest:
S. E. Ward.
Jas. C. O'Connor.
J. M. Sherwood.
W. C. Slicer.
Sam Deon.
H. M. Matthews.
Joseph Bissonette, interpreter.
Nicholas Janis, interpreter.
Lefroy Jott, interpreter.
Antoine Janis, interpreter.

Executed on the part of the Minneconjou band of Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto duly authorized.


At Fort Laramie, D. T., May 26, 68, 13 names.

Heh-won-ge-chat, his x mark, One Horn. [SEAL]
Oh-pon-ah-tah-e-manne, his x mark, The Elk that bellows Walking. [SEAL]

At Fort Laramie, D. T., May 25, 68, 2 names.

Heh-ho-lah-reh-cha-skah, his x mark, Young White Bull, [SEAL]
Wah chah chum kah coh kee-pah, his x mark, One that is afraid of Shield. [SEAL]
He-hon-ne-shakta, his x mark, The Old Owl. [SEAL]
Moc-pe-a-toh, his x mark, Blue Cloud. [SEAL]
Oh-pong-ge-le-skah, his x mark Spotted Elk. [SEAL]
Tah-tonk-ka-hon-ke-schne, his x mark, Slow Bull. [SEAL]
Shonk-a-nee-shah-shah-a-tah-pe, his x mark, The Dog Chief. [SEAL]
Ma-to-tah-ta-tonk-ka, his x mark, Bull Bear. [SEAL]
Wom-beh-le-ton-kah, his x mark, The Big Eagle. [SEAL]
Ma-toh-eh-schne-lah, his x mark, The Lone Bear. [SEAL]
Mah-toh-ke-su-yah, his x mark, The One who Remembers the Bear. [SEAL]
Ma-toh-oh-he-to-keh, his x mark, The Brave Bear. [SEAL]
Eh-che-ma-heh, his x mark, The Runner. [SEAL]
Ti-ki-ya, his x mark, The Hard. He-ma-za, his x mark, Iron Horn. [SEAL]


Attest:
Jas. C. O'Connor.
Wm. H. Brown.
Nicholas Janis, interpreter.
Antoine Janis, interpreter.


Executed on the part of the Yanctonais band of Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto duly authorized.

Mah-to-non-pah, his x mark, Two Bears. [SEAL]
Ma-to-hna-skin-ya, his x mark, Mad Bear. [SEAL]
He-o-pu-za, his x mark, Louzy. [SEAL]
Ah-ke-che-tah-che-ca-dan, his x mark, Little Soldier. [SEAL]
Mah-to-e-tan-chan, his x mark, Chief Bear. [SEAL]
Cu-wi-h-win, his x mark, Rotten Stomach. [SEAL]
Skun-ka-we-tko, his x mark, Fool Dog. [SEAL]
Ish-ta-sap-pah, his x mark, Black Eye. [SEAL]
Ih-tan-chan, his x mark, The Chief. [SEAL]
I-a-wi-ca-ka, his x mark, The one who Tells the Truth. [SEAL]
Ah-ke-che-tah, his x mark, The Soldier. [SEAL]
Ta-shi-na-gi, his x mark, Yellow Robe. [SEAL]
Nah-pe-ton-ka, his x mark, Big Hand. [SEAL]
Chan-tee-we-kto, his x mark, Fool Heart. [SEAL]
Hoh-gan-sah-pa, his x mark, Black Catfish. [SEAL]
Mah-to-wah-kan, his x mark, Medicine Bear. [SEAL]
Shun-ka-kan-sha, his x mark, Red Horse. [SEAL]
Wan-rode, his x mark, The Eagle. [SEAL]
Can-hpi-sa-pa, his x mark, Black Tomahawk. [SEAL]
War-he-le-re, his x mark, Yellow Eagle. [SEAL]
Cha-ton-che-ca, his x mark, Small Hawk, or Long Fare. [SEAL]
Shu-ger-mon-e-too-ha-ska, his x mark, Tall Wolf. [SEAL]
Ma-to-u-tah-kah, his x mark, Sitting Bear. [SEAL]
Hi-ha-cah-ge-na-skene, his x mark, Mad Elk. [SEAL]
Arapahoes:
Little Chief, his x mark. [SEAL]
Tall Bear, his x mark. [SEAL]
Top Man, his x mark. [SEAL]
Neva, his x mark. [SEAL]
The Wounded Bear, his x mark. [SEAL]
Thirlwind, his x mark The Fox, his x mark. [SEAL]
The Dog Big Mouth, his x mark. [SEAL]
Spotted Wolf, his x mark. [SEAL]
Sorrel Horse, his x mark. [SEAL]
Black Coal, his x mark. [SEAL]
Big Wolf, his x mark. [SEAL]
Knock-knee, his x mark. [SEAL]
Black Crow, his x mark. [SEAL]
The Lone Old Man, his x mark. [SEAL]
Paul, his x mark. [SEAL]
Black Bull, his x mark. [SEAL]
Big Track, his x mark. [SEAL]
The Foot, his x mark. [SEAL]
Black White, his x mark. [SEAL]
Yellow Hair, his x mark. [SEAL]
Little Shield, his x mark. [SEAL]
Black Bear, his x mark. [SEAL]
Wolf Mocassin, his x mark. [SEAL]
Big Robe, his x mark. [SEAL]
Wolf Chief, his x mark. [SEAL]


Witnesses:
Robt. P. McKibbin, captain, Fourth Infantry, brevet lieutenant-colonel, U. S. Army, commanding Fort Laramie.
Wm. H. Powell, brevet major, captain, Fourth Infantry.
Henry W. Patterson, captain, Fourth Infantry.
Theo. E. True, second lieutenant, Fourth Infantry.
W. G. Bullock.
Chas. E. Guern, special Indian interpreter for the peace commission.


Fort Laramie, Wg. T., Nov. 6, 1868

Makh-pi-ah-lu-tah, his x mark, Red Cloud. [SEAL]
Wa-ki-ah-we-cha-shah, his x mark, Thunder Man. [SEAL]
Ma-zah-zah-geh, his x mark, Iron Cane. [SEAL]
Wa-umble-why-wa-ka-tuyah, his x mark, High Eagle. [SEAL]
Ko-ke-pah, his x mark, Man Afraid. [SEAL]
Wa-ki-ah-wa-kou-ah, his x mark, Thunder Flying Running. [SEAL]


Witnesses:
W. McE. Dye, brevet colonel, U. S. Army, commanding.
A. B. Cain, captain, Fourth Infantry, brevet major, U. S. Army.
Robt. P. McKibbin, captain, Fourth Infantry, brevet lieutenant-colonel, U. S. Army.
Jno. Miller, captain, Fourth Infantry.
G. L. Luhn, first lieutenant, Fourth Infantry, brevet captain, U. S. Army.
H. C. Sloan, second lieutenant, Fourth Infantry.
Whittingham Cox, first lieutenant, Fourth Infantry.
A. W. Vogdes, first lieutenant, Fourth Infantry.
Butler D. Price, second lieutenant, Fourth Infantry.


HEADQRS., FORT LARAMIE, Novr. 6, 68.

Executed by the above on this date.
All of the Indians are Ogallalahs excepting Thunder Man and Thunder Flying Running, who are Brulés.


Wm. McE. Dye,
Major Fourth Infantry, and Brevet-Colonel
U. S. Army, Commanding.
Attest:
Jas. C. O'Connor.
Nicholas Janis, interpreter.
Franc. La Framboise, interpreter

P. J. De Smet, S.J., Missionary among the Indians.
Saml. D. Hinman, B. D., missionary.

Executed on the part of the Uncpapa bandof the Sioux, by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto and duly authorized.

Co-dam-i-ya, his x mark, The Man that Goes in the Middle. [SEAL]
Ma-to-ca-wa-weksa, his x mark, Bear Rib. [SEAL]
Ta-to-ka-in-yan-ke, his x mark, Running Antelope. [SEAL]
Kan-gi-wa-ki-ta, his x mark, Looking Crow. [SEAL]
A-ki-ci-ta-han-ska, his x mark, Long Soldier. [SEAL]
Wa-ku-te-ma-ni, his x mark, The One who Shoots Walking. [SEAL]
Un-kca-ki-ka, his x mark, The Magpie. [SEAL]
Kan-gi-o-ta, his x mark, Plenty Crow. [SEAL]
Ha-ma-za, his x mark, Iron Horn. [SEAL]
Shun-ka-i-na-pin, his x mark, Wolf Necklace. [SEAL]
I-we-hi-yu, his x mark, The Man who Bleeds from the Mouth. [SEAL]
He-ha-ka-pa, his x mark, Elk Head. [SEAL]
I-zu-za, his x mark, Grind Stone. [SEAL]
Shun-ka-wi-tko, his x mark, Fool Dog. [SEAL]
Ma-kpi-ya-po, his x mark, Blue Cloud. [SEAL]
Wa-mni-pi-lu-ta, his x mark, Red Eagle. [SEAL]
Ma-to-can-te, his x mark, Bear's Heart. [SEAL]
A-ki-ci-ta-i-tan-can, his x mark, Chief Soldier. [SEAL]

Attest:
Jas. C. O'Connor.
Nicholas Janis,interpreter.
Franc. La Frambois[e], interpreter.
P. J. DeSmet, S.J., missionary among the Indians.
Saml. D. Hinman, missionary.

Executed on the part of the Blackfeet band of the Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto duly authorized.

Can-te-pe-ta, his x mark, Fire Heart. [SEAL]
Wan-mdi-kte, his x mark, The One who Kills Eagle. [SEAL]
Sho-ta, his x mark, Smoke. [SEAL]
Wan-mdi-ma-ni, his x mark, Walking Eagle. [SEAL]
Wa-shi-cun-ya-ta-pi, his x mark, Chief White Man. [SEAL]
Kan-gi-i-yo-tan-ke, his x mark, Sitting Crow. [SEAL]
Pe-ji, his x mark, The Grass. [SEAL]
Kda-ma-ni, his x mark, The One that Rattles as he Walks. [SEAL]
Wah-han-ka-sa-pa, his x mark, Black Shield. [SEAL]
Can-te-non-pa, his x mark, Two Hearts. [SEAL]

Attest:
Jas. C. O'Connor.
Nicholas Janis,interpreter.
Franc. La Framboise, interpreter.
P. J. DeSmet, S.J., missionary among the Indians.
Saml. D. Hinman, missionary.

Executed on the part of the Cutheads band of the Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto duly authorized.

To-ka-in-yan-ka, his x mark, The One who Goes Ahead Running. [SEAL]
Ta-tan-ka-wa-kin-yan, his x mark, Thunder Bull. [SEAL]
Sin-to-min-sa-pa, his x mark, All over Black. [SEAL]
Can-i-ca, his x mark, The One who Took the Stick. [SEAL]
Pa-tan-ka, his x mark, Big Head. [SEAL]

Attest:
Jas. C. O'Connor.
Nicholas Janis,interpreter.
Franc. La Frambois[e], interpreter.
P. J. DeSmet, S.J., missionary among the Indians.
Saml. D. Hinman, missionary.

Executed on the part of the Two Kettle band of the Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto duly authorized.

Ma-wa-tan-ni-han-ska, his x mark, Long Mandan. [SEAL]
Can-kpe-du-ta, his x mark, Red War Club. [SEAL]
Can-ka-ga, his x mark, The Log. [SEAL]

Attest:
Jas. C. O'Connor.
Nicholas Janis,interpreter.
Franc. La Framboise, interpreter.
P. J. DeSmet, S.J., missionary among the Indians.
Saml. D. Hinman, missionary.

Executed on the part of the Sans Arch band of the Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto duly authorized.

He-na-pin-wa-ni-ca, his x mark, The One that has Neither Horn. [SEAL]
Wa-inlu-pi-lu-ta, his x mark, Red Plume. [SEAL]
Ci-tan-gi, his x mark, Yellow Hawk. [SEAL]
He-na-pin-wa-ni-ca, is x mark, No Horn. [SEAL]

Attest:
Jas. C. O'Connor.
Nicholas Janis,interpreter.
Franc. La Frambois[e], interpreter.
P. J. DeSmet, S.J., missionary among the Indians.
Saml. D. Hinman, missionary.

Executed on the part of the Santee band of the Sioux by the chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being thereunto duly authorized.

Wa-pah-shaw, his x mark, Red Ensig. [SEAL]
Wah-koo-tay, his x mark, Shooter. [SEAL]
Hoo-sha-sha, his x mark, Red Legs. [SEAL]
O-wan-cha-du-ta, his x mark, Scarlet all over. [SEAL]
Wau-mace-tan-ka, his mark x, Big Eagle. [SEAL]
Cho-tan-ka-e-na-pe, his x mark, Flute-player. [SEAL]
Ta-shun-ke-mo-za, his x mark, His Iron Dog. [SEAL]

Attest:
Saml. D. Hinman, missionary.
J. N. Chickering,
Second Lieutenant, Twenty-second Infantry, brevet captain, U.S. Army.
P. J. DeSmet, S.J.
Nicholas Janis,interpreter.
Franc. La Framboise, interpreter.

_________________
Damakotah!


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:21 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
AGREEMENT WITH THE SIOUX OF VARIOUS TRIBES
Oct. 17, 1882 to Jan. 3,1883
Unratified
See H. R. Ex. Dc. 68, 47th Congress, 2d session.

This agreement made pursuant to an item in the sundry civil act of Congress, approved August 7, 1882, by Newton Edmunds, Peter C. Shannon, and James H. Teller, duly appointed commissioners on the part of the United States, and the different bands of the Sioux Indians by their chiefs and headmen whose names are hereto subscribed, they being duly authorized to act in the premises, witnesseth that--


ARTICLE I.

Whereas it is the policy of the Government of the United States to provide for said Indians a permanent home where they may live after the manner of white men, and be protected in their rights of property, person and life, therefore to carry out such policy it is agreed that hereafter the permanent of the various bands of said Indians shall be upon the separate reservations hereinafter described and set apart. Said Indians, acknowledging the right of the chiefs and headmen of the various bands at each agency to determine for themselves and for their several bands, with the Government of the United States, the boundaries of their separate reservations, hereby agree to accept and abide by such agreements and conditions as to the location and boundaries of such reservations as may be made and agreed upon by the United States and the band or bands for which such separate reservation may be made, and as the said separate boundaries may be herein set forth.


ARTICLE II.

The said Indians do hereby relinquish and cede to the United States all of the Great Sioux Reservationas reserved to them by the treaty of 1868, and modified by the agreement of 1876 not herein specifically reserved and set apart as separate reservations for them. The said bands do severally agree to accept and occupy the separate reservations to which they are herein assigned as their permanent homes, and they do hereby severally relinquish to the other bands respectively occupying the other separate reservations, all right, title, and interest in and to the same reserving to themselves only the reservation herein set apart for their separate use and occupation.


ARTICLE III.

In consideration of the cession of territory and rights, as herein made, and upon compliance with each and every obligation assumed by the said Indians, the United States hereby agrees that each head of a family entitled to select three hundred and twenty acres of land, under Article 6, of the treaty of 1868, may, in the manner and form therein prescribed, select and secure for purposes of cultivation, in addition to said three hundred and twenty acres, a tract of land not exceeding eighty (80) acres within his reservation, for each of his children, living at the ratification of this agreement, under the age of eighteen (18) years; and such child, upon arriving at the age of eighteen years shall have such selection certified to him or her in lieu of the selection granted in the second clause of said Article 6; but no right of alienation or encumbrance is acquired by such selection and occupation: unless hereafter authorized by act of Congress.


ARTICLE IV.

The United States further agrees to furnish and deliver to the said Indians Atwenty-five thousand cows, and one thousand bulls, of which the occupants of each of said separate reservations shall receive such proportion as the number of Indians thereon bears to the whole number of Indian parties to this agreement. All of the said cattle and their progeny shall bear the brand of the Indian department, and shall be held subject to the disposal of said department, and shall not be sold, exchanged or slaughtered, except by consent or order of the agent in charge, until such time as this restriction shall be removed by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.


ARTICLE V.

It is also agreed that the United States will furnish and deliver to each lodge of said Indians or family of persons legally incorporated with them, who shall, in good faith, select land within the reservation to which such lodge or family belongs, and begin the cultivation thereof, one good cow, and one well broken pair of oxen, with yoke and chain, within reasonable time after making such selection and settlement.


ARTICLE VI.

The United States will also furnish to each reservation herein made and described, a physician, carpenter, miller, engineer, farmer, and blacksmith, for a period of ten years from the date of this agreement.


ARTICLE VII.

It is hereby agreed that the sixteenth and thirty-sixth sections of each township in said separate reservations shall be reserved for school purposes, for the use of the inhabitants of said reservations, as provided in sections 1946 and 1947 of the revised statutes of the United States. It is also agreed that the provisions of Article 7 of the treaty of 1868, securing to said Indians the benefits of education, shall be con-tinned in force for not less than twenty (20) years, from and after the ratification of this agreement.


ARTICLE VIII.

The provisions of the treaty of 1868, and the agreement of 1876, except as herein modified, shall continue in full force.

This agreement shall not be binding upon either party until it shall have received the approval of the President and Congress of the United States.

Dated and signed at Santee Agency, Nebraska, October 17th, 1882.

Newton Edmunds. [SEAL.]
Peter C. Shannon. [SEAL.]
James H. Teller. [SEAL.]


The foregoing articles of agreement, having been fully explained to us in open council, we the undersigned chiefs and head-men of the Sioux Indians receiving rations and annuities at the Santee Agency, in Knox County, in the State of Nebraska, do hereby consent and agree to all the stipulations therein contained, saving and reserving all our rights, both collective and individual, in and to the Santee Reservation, in said Knox County and State of Nebraska, upon which we and our people are residing.

Witness our hands and seals at Santee Agency this 17th day of October, 1882.

Robert Hakewaste, his x mark. Seal.
John Buoy. Seal.
Joseph Rouillard. Seal.
Solomon Jones. Seal.
William Dick, his x mark. Seal.
Samuel Hawley. Seal.
Eli Abraham. Seal.
Iron Elk, his x mark. Seal.
Husasa, his x mark. Seal.
Harpi yaduta. Seal.
Napoleon Wabashaw. Seal.
Thomas Wakute. Seal.
A.J. Campbell. Seal.
Daniel Graham. Seal.
Star Frazier. Seal.
Albert E. Frazier. Seal.
John White. Seal.
Henry Jones. Seal.
Louis Frenier. Seal.
John Reibe. Seal.


Attest:

Alfred L. Riggs, Missionary to the Dakotas.
W. W. Fowler, Missionary to Santee Sioux.
Isaiah Lightner, U. S. Indian Agent.
Charles Mitchell, U. S. Interpreter.
C. L. Austin, Agency Clerk.
Geo. W. Ira, Agency Physician.


I certify that the foregoing agreement was read and explained by me, and was fully understood by the above-named Sioux Indians, before signing, and that the same was executed by said Sioux Indians, at Santee Agency, county of Knox, and State of Nebraska, on the 17th day of October, 1882.

Sam'l D. Hinman,
Official Interpreter.

It is hereby agreed that the separate reservation for the Indians receiving rations and annuities at Pine Ridge Agency, Dakota, shall be bounded and described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at the intersection of the one hundred and third meridian of longitude with the northern boundary of the state of Nebraska, thence north along said meridian to the south fork of Cheyenne river, and down said stream to a point due west from the intersection of White River with the one hundred and second meridian; thence due east to said point of intersection and down said White River to a point in longitude one hundred and one degrees and twenty minutes west, thence due south to said north line of the State of Nebraska, thence west on said north line to the place of beginning.

Dated and signed at Pine Ridge Agency, Dakota, October 28th, 1882.

Newton Edmunds. [SEAL.]
Peter C. Shannon. [SEAL.]
James H. Teller. [SEAL.]


The foregoing articles of agreement having been fully explained to us in open council, we, the undersigned chiefs and headmen of the Sioux Indians receiving rations and annuities at Pine Ridge Agency in the Territory of Dakota, do hereby consent and agree to all the stipulations therein contained.

Witness our hands and seals at Pine Ridge Agency, Dakota, this 28th day of October, 1882.

Mahpiya-luta, his x mark. Seal.
Taopicikala, his x mark. Seal.
Simka-luta, his x mark. Seal.
Simka-wakan-hin-to, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-hunka-sni, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Sunanito-wankantuya, his x mark. Seal.
Pehinzizi, his x mark. Seal.
Canker-tanka, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-bloka, his x mark. Seal.
Wapaha-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Mim-wanica, his x mark. Seal.
Owa-sica-hoksila, his x mark. Seal.
Toicuwa, his x mark. Seal.
Sumnanito-isnala, his x mark. Seal.
Kisun-sni,-his x mark. Seal.
Hehaka-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Zitkala-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Ogle-sa, his x mark. Seal.
Sunmanito-wakpa, his x mark. Seal.
Wasicum-tasunke, his x mark. Seal.
Egeonge-word, Captain Polo. Seal.
Akicita-injin, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunko-inyauko, his x mark. Seal.
Wagmu-su, his x mark. Seal.
Wamli-heton, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Sunmanito-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-unzica, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Hinho-kinyau, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunka-kokipapi, sr., his x mark. Seal.
Hazska-mlaska, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunke-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Okiksahe, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-nasula, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Wicahhpi-yamin, his x mark. Seal.
Wasicun-waukautuya, his x mark. Seal.
Antoine Leiddeau, his x mark. Seal.
Beaver Morto, his x mark. Seal.
Sam Daon. Seal.
Edward Larramie. Seal.
Wakinyan-peta, his x mark. Seal.
Pehan-luta, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunka-kokipapi, his x mark. Seal.
Conica-wanica, his x mark. Seal.
Suniska-yaha, his x mark. Seal.
Wahanka-wakuwa, his x mark. Seal.
Si-tanka, his x mark. Seal.
Wahukeza-wompa, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-hi, his x mark. Seal.
Wicasa-tankala, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-witkotkoka, his x mark. Seal.
Wankan-mato, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-himka-sni, his x mark. Seal.
Manka-tamahica, his x mark. Seal.
Cotan-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
John Jangrau, his x mark. Seal.
Charles Jamis, his x mark. Seal.
Richard Hunter, his x mark. Seal.
David Gallineau. Seal.
Thomas Toion, his x mark. Seal.
James Richard, his x mark. Seal.
Opauingowica-kte, his x mark. Seal.
Hogan, his x mark. Seal.
Antoine Provost. Seal.
Benj. Claymore. Seal.
Soldier Storr. Seal.
Sili-kte, his x mark. Seal.
Petaga, his x mark. Seal.
Talo-kakse, his x mark. Seal.
Wiyaka-wicasa, his x mark. Seal.
Zitkala-napin, his x mark. Seal.
Leon F. Pallardy, his x mark. Seal.
J. C. Whelan. Seal.
Sunka-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Pehin-zizi-si-ca, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-akisya, his x mark. Seal.
Wasicun-mato, his x mark. Seal.
Wi-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Taku-kokipa-sni, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-can-wegna-eya, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-Wakuya, his x mark. Seal.


Attest:

S. S. Benedict, U. S. Indian Interpreter.
V. T. McGellycuddy, U. S. End. Ag't.
J. W. Alder, Agency Clerk.
William Garnett, Agency Interpreter.


I hereby certify that the foregoing agreement was read and explained by me and was fully understood by the above named Sioux Indians, before signing, and that the same was executed by said Indians at Pine Ridge Agency, Dakota, on the 29th day of October, 1883.

Sam'l D. Hinman,
Official Interpreter.

It is hereby agreed that the separate reservation for the Indians receiving rations and annuities at Rosebud Agency, Dakota, shall be bounded and described as follows, to wit:-

Beginning on the north boundary of the State of Nebraska, at a point in longitude one hundred and one degrees and twenty minutes west, and running thence due north to White River, thence down said White River to a point in longitude ninety-nine degrees and thirty minutes west, thence due south to said north boundary of the state of Nebraska, and thence west on said north boundary to the place of beginning. If any of said Indians belonging to the Rosebud agency have permanently located east of longitude ninety-nine degrees and thirty minutes, they may hold the lands so located, and have the same certified to them in accordance with the provisions of Article 6, of the treaty of 1868 and Article 3 of this agreement, or they may return to the separate reservation above described, in which case they shall be entitled to receive from the government the actual value of all improvements made on such locations.

Dated and signed at Rosebud Agency, Dakota, this 6th day of November, 1882.

Newton Edmunds. [SEAL.]
James H. Teller. [SEAL.]
Peter C. Shannon. [SEAL.]


The foregoing articles of agreement having been fully explained to us in open council, we, the undersigned chiefs and headmen of the Sioux Indians receiving rations and annuities at Rosebud Agency in, the Territory of Dakota, do hereby consent and agree to all the stipulations therein contained.

Witness our hands and seals at Rosebud Agency, Dakota, this 6th day of November, 1882.

Sinto-gleska, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-luzaham, his x mark. Seal.
Wakinyau-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-ohanka, his x mark. Seal.
Wakinyau-ska, 2nd, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunke-tokeca, his x mark. Seal.
Asampi, his x mark. Seal.
Mahpiya-inazin, his x mark. Seal.
He-to-pa, his x mark. Seal.
Tasimke-wakita, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-bloka, his x mark. Seal.
Caugleska-wakinyin, his x mark. Seal.
Wamniomni-akicita, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmli-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Wamli-waste, his x mark. Seal.
Mahpiya-tatanka, his x mark. Seal.
Wapashupi, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wankantuya, his x mark. Seal.
Igmu-wakute, his x mark. Seal.
Hohaka-gloska, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-ska, his x mark, Capt. Police. Seal.
Pehan-san-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Okise-wakan, his x mark. Seal.
Getau-wakimyau, his x mark. Seal.
Wakinyau-tomaheca, his x mark. Seal.
Mloka-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Toka-kte, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wakan, his x mark. Seal.
Tacauhpi-to, his x mark. Seal.
Ho-waste, his x mark. Seal.
Ito-cantkoze, his x mark. Seal.
Kutepi, his x mark. Seal.
Zaya-hiyaya, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-glakmyau, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-cante, his x mark. Seal.
Cecala, his x mark. Seal.
Pehin-zi-sica, his x mark. Seal.
Pte-he-napin, his x mark. Seal.
Sunsun-pa, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunke-wamli, his x mark. Seal.
Louis Richard. Seal.
Louis Bordeax. Seal.
Tasunke-hin-zi, his x mark. Seal.
Itoga-otanka, his x mark. Seal.
Tunkan-sila, his x mark. Seal.
Wagleksun-tanka, his x mark. Seal.
Caugleska-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Wospi-gli, his x mark. Seal.
Naca-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Cante-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-kucila, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wakuwa, his x mark. Seal.
Si-hauska, his x mark. Seal.
Kinyau-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka, his x mark. Seal.
Hehaka-wanapoya, his x mark. Seal.
Taspan, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunke-hin-zi, his x mark. Seal.
Wicauhpi-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Wohela, his x mark. Seal.
Jack Stead. Seal.
Joseph Schweigman. Seal.
Zitkala-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-najin, his x mark. Seal.
Yahota, his x mark. Seal.
Hunku, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-wanmli, his x mark. Seal.
Pte-san-wanmli, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-ho-waste, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunke-hin-zi, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunke-luzahan, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-ha, his x mark. Seal.
Cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Si-husakpe, his x mark. Seal.
Thomas Dorion, his x mark. Seal.
Tacannonpe-waukantuya, his x mark. Seal.
Caza, his x mark. Seal.
Wagluhe, his x mark. Seal.
Ista-toto, his x mark. Seal.
Wahacauka-hinapa, his x mark. Seal.
Mle-wakan, his x mark. Seal.
Hehaka-wanmli, his x mark. Seal.
Si-tompi-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Hehaka-witko, his x mark. Seal.
Sinte-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Wahacauka-waste, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-kinajin, his x mark. Seal.
Mawatani-hanska, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmli-wicasa, his x mark. Seal.
Henry Clairmont, his x mark. Seal.
Cecil Iron-wing. Seal.
Mato-maka-kicum, his x mark. Seal.
Kiyetehan, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wanmli, his x mark. Seal.
Ite-cihila, his x mark. Seal.
Cante-peta, his x mark. Seal.
William Bordeau. Seal.
Wanmlisun-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Louis Moran, his x mark. Seal.
William Redmond. Seal.
Tatanka-taninyau-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-ite-wanagi, his x mark. Seal.
Wanagi pa, his x mark. Seal.
Baptiste McKinzy, his x mark. Seal.
John Cordier, his x mark. Seal.
Akan-yanka-kte, his x mark. Seal.
Maza-wicasa, his x mark. Seal.
Ipiyaka, his x mark. Seal.
Tunka-yuha, his x mark. Seal.
Tawahacanka-sna, his x mark. Seal.
Cetan-nonpa, his x mark. Seal.
Zuya-hanska, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wakau, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmli-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Keya-tucuhu, his x mark. Seal.
Cega, his x mark. Seal.
Ohan-ota, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-wananon, his x mark. Seal.
Dominick Brey. Seal.


Attest:

Jas. G. Wright, U. S. Ind. Ag't.
Chas. P. Jordan, Clerk.
Chas. R. Corey, Physician.
Louis Raulindeane, Agency Interpreter.


I hereby certify that the foregoing agreement was read and explained by me and was fully understood by the above-named Sioux Indians before signing, and that the same was executed by said Indians at Rosebud Agency, Dakota, on the 6th day of November, 1882.

Sam'l D. Hinman,
Official Interpreter.

It is hereby agreed that the separate reservations for the Indians receiving rations and annuities at Standing Rock Agency, Dakota, shall be bounded and described as follows, to wit:- Beginning at a point at low-water mark, on the east bank of the Missouri River, opposite the mouth of cannon ball river; thence down said east bank along said low-water mark to a point opposite the mouth of Grand River, thence westerly to said Grand River, and up and along the middle channel of the same to its intersection with the one hundred and second meridian of longitude; thence north along said meridian to its intersection with the south branch of Cannon Ball Riveralso known as Cedar Creek; thence down said south branch of Cannon Ball River to its intersection with the main Cannon Ball River, and down said main Cannon Ball River to the Missouri River at the place of beginning.

Dated and signed at Standing Rock Agency, Dakota, this 30th day of November, 1882.

Newton Edmunds.[SEAL.]
James H. Teller.[SEAL.]
Peter C. Shannon. [SEAL.]


The foregoing articles of agreement having been fully explained to us in open council, we, the undersigned chiefs and head-men of the Sioux Indians, receiving rations and annuities at Standing Rock Agency, in the Territory of Dakota, do hereby consent and agree to all the stipulations therein contained. We also agree that the Lower Yanktonais Indians at Crow Creek, and the Indians now with Sitting Bull, may share with us the above-described separate reservation, if assigned thereto by the United States, with consent of said Indians.

Witness our hands and seals at Standing Rock Agency, Dakota, this 30th day of November, 1882.

Akicita-hauska, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-gnaskinyan, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-nonpa, his x mark. Seal.
Ista-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmli-waukautuya, his x mark. Seal.
Wakute-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Wiyaka-hanska, his x mark. Seal.
Cante-peta, his x mark. Seal.
John Grass, his x mark. Seal.
Sasunke-luta, his x mark. Seal.
Owape, his x mark. Seal.
Cante-peta, sr., his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wayuhi, his x mark. Seal.
Pahin-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-atoyapi, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-kawinge, his x mark. Seal.
Wakinyan-watakope, his x mark. Seal.
Tasina-luta, his x mark. Seal.
Tasunke-hin-zi, his x mark. Seal.
Hehaka-okan-nazin, his x mark. Seal.
Maga, his x mark. Seal.
Taloka-inyauke, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wapostan, his x mark. Seal.
Heton-yuha, his x mark. Seal.
Sungila-luta, his x mark. Seal.
Mastinca, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmli-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-mato, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wankantuya, his x mark. Seal.
Ite-glaga, his x mark. Seal.
Cetan-unzica, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-luta, his x mark. Seal.
Pizi, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-wanagi, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmdi-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Tacanhpi-kokipapi, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-cikida, his x mark. Seal.
Wahacanka-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Sna-waknya, his x mark. Seal.
Cante-tchiya, his x mark. Seal.
Wan-awega, his x mark. Seal.
Wakankdi-sapa. his x mark. Seal.
Ingang-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmdi-sake, his x mark. Seal.
Nakata-wakinyan, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmli-watakpe, his x mark. Seal.
Hato-sabiciya, his x mark. Seal.
Baptiste Rondeau, his x mark. Seal.
Tacanhpi-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Hato-ite-wakan, his x mark. Seal.
Wakinyan-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Hakikta-nazin, his x mark. Seal.
Hitonkala-ista, his x mark. Seal.
Hanpa-napin, his x mark. Seal.
Waumdi-yuha, his x mark. Seal.
Hinto-kdeska, his x mark. Seal.
Candi-ynta, his x mark. Seal.
Zitka-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Nasula-tonka, his x mark. Seal.
Hohaka-ho-waste, his x mark. Seal.
Sunk-sapa-wieasa, his x mark. Seal.
Mastinca, his x mark. Seal.
Thomas C. Fly. Seal.
Joseph Primeau. Seal.
Leon Primeau. Seal.
Matilda Galpin, her x mark. Seal.
John Pleets. Seal.
Tasumke-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Ota-inyanke, his x mark. Seal.
Wahascanka, his x mark. Seal.
Anoka-sau, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-hota, his x mark. Seal.
Hehakato-tamahoca, his x mark. Seal.
Tamina-wewe, his x mark. Seal.
Waga, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-duta, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wankantuya, his x mark. Seal.
Iyayung-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Magi-wakau, his x mark. Seal.
Wamli-wanapeya, his x mark. Seal.
Can-lea, his x mark. Seal.
Tahim,a-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Hogan-duta, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-wanzila, his x mark. Seal.
Ite-wakan, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-wawapin, his x mark. Seal.
Cetau-to, his x mark. Seal.
Inyan-knwapi, his x mark. Seal.
Waukau-inyanka, his x mark. Seal.
Sunka-duta, his x mark. Seal.
Pehin-jasa, his x mark. Seal.
Waumdi-watakpe, his x mark. Seal.
Wapata, his x mark. Seal.
Taopi, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-unzinea, his x mark. Seal.
Zitkadan-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Cetau-iyotanka, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-napin, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-hanska, his x mark. Seal.
Kaddy, his x mark. Seal.
Wanmdi-konza, his x mark. Seal.
Mini-aku, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Makoyate-duta, his x mark. Seal.
Pa-inyankana, his'x mark. Seal.
Mato-zina, his x mark. Seal.
Isanati-win-yuza, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wastedan, his x mark. Seal.
Hehaka-ho-waste, his x mark. Seal.
Gan-waste, his x mark. Seal.
Itohega-tate, his x mark. Seal.
Hi-seca, his x mark. Seal.
Hunke-sni, his x mark. Seal.
Gilciya, his x mark. Seal.
Owe-nakebeza, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-ho-tanka, his x mark. Seal.
Henry Agard, his x mark. Seal.
Hitonka-sau-sinte, his x mark. Seal.
Antoine Claymore, his x mark. Seal.
Benedict Cihila. Seal.
Charles Marshall, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-wanzila, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-hauska, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanka-himke-sni, his x mark. Seal.
Kankeca-duta, his x mark. Seal.
Hehaka-cante, his x mark. Seal.
Sna-wakuya, his x mark. Seal.
Citan-pegnaka, his x mark. Seal.
Wasu-mato, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-kawinge, his x mark. Seal.
Nig-woku, his x mark. Seal.
Maza-kan-wicaki, his x mark. Seal.
Waniyutu-wakuya, his x mark. Seal.
Waumdi-wicasa, his x mark. Seal.
Putin-hanska, his x mark. Seal.
Hoksina-waste, his x mark. Seal.
Sam-iyeiciya, his x mark. Seal.
Wahaeanka-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Tatanke-ehanna, his x mark. Seal.
Tawacanka-wakinyan, his x mark. Seal.


Attest:

James McLaughlin, U. S. Indian Agent.
James H. Stewart, Agency Clerk.
Thomas H. Miller, Issue Clerk.
Charles Primeau, Interpreter.
Philip L. Wells, Interpreter. .
Joseph Primeau, Interpreter.
M. L. McLaughlin, Agency Interpreter.


I hereby certify that the foregoing agreement was read and explained by me and was fully understood by the above-named Sioux Indians before signing, and that the same was executed by said Indians at Standing Rock Agency, Dakota, on the 30th day of November, 1882.

Sam'l D. Hinman, Official Interpreter.

It is hereby agreed that the separate reservation for the Indians receiving rations and annuities at Cheyenne River Agency, Dakota, and for such other Indians as may hereafter be assigned thereto, shall be bounded and described as follows, to wit:-

Beginning at a point at low-water mark on the east bank of the Missouri River opposite the mouth of Grand River said point being the south-easterly corner of the Standing-Rock Reservation; thence down said east bank of the Missouri River along said low-water mark to a point opposite the mouth of the Cheyenne river; thence west to said Cheyenne River and up the same to its intersection with the one hundred and second meridian of longitude; thence north along said meridian to its intersection with the Grand River; thence down said Grand River, along the middle channel thereof, to the Missouri River, at the place of beginning.

It is also agreed that said Indians shall receive all necessary aid from the government in their removal to said reservation, and when so removed, each of said Indians shall be entitled to receive from the government the full value of all improvements in buildings or on lands owned by him at the time of such removal and lost to him thereby. Said compensation shall be given in such manner and on such appraisements as shall be ordered by the Secretary of the Interior.

Dated and signed at Cheyenne River Agency, Dakota, this 21st day of December.

Newton Edmunds.[SEAL.]
James H. Teller. [SEAL.]
Peter C. Shannon. [SEAL.]


The foregoing articles of agreement having been fully explained to us in open council, we, the undersigned chiefs and headmen of the Sioux Indians receiving rations and annuities at the Cheyenne River Agency, in the Territory of Dakota, do hereby consent and agree to all the stipulations therein contained.

Witness our hands and seals at Cheyenne River Agency, Dakota, this 21st day of December, 1882.

Zitkala-kinyan, his x mark. Seal.
Cetan-tokapa, his x mark. Seal.
Cuwi-hda-mani, his x mark. Seal.
Waumli-ohitika, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-wanmli, his x mark. Seal.
Wagmasa, his x mark. Seal.
Toicuwa, his x mark. Seal.
Cuwila, his x mark. Seal.
Waumli-gleska, his x mark Seal.
. Mato-nakpa, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-luta, his x mark. Seal.
Maste-au, his x mark. Seal.
Waunatan, his x mark. Seal.
Nape-wanmiomin, his x mark. Seal.
Cante-wanica, his x mark. Seal.
Seal.Sunka-ha-oin, his x mark. Seal.
Wokai, his x mark. Seal.
Tacauhpi-maza, his x mark. Seal.
Wankan-mato, his x mark. Seal.
Seal.Nato-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Cetan, his x mark. Seal.
Nahpiya-watakpe, his x mark. Seal.
Maza-hanpa, his x mark. Seal.
Seal.Louis Benoist, his x mark. Seal.
Maga-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Wahacauka-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Kangi-wakuya, his x mark. Seal.
Sunk-ska, his x mark. Seal.
Pte-san-wicasa, his x mark. Seal.
Wanroll-main, his x mark. Seal.
Mahpiya-iyapata, his x mark. Seal.
Seal.Wicasa-itancan, his x mark. Seal.
Mato-topa, his x mark. Seal.
Siha-sapa-cikala, his x mark. Seal.
Seal.Cawhpi-sapa, his x mark. Seal.
Eugene Bruguier. Seal.
Tatanke-paha-akan-nazin, his x mark. Seal.


Attest:

Wm. A. Swan, United States Indian Agent.
Rob't V. Levers, Agency Clerk.
N. G. Landmepe, Issue Clerk.
Narcisse Narcello, his x mark, Agency Interpreter.
Mark Wells, Interpreter.


It having been understood and agreed by the undersigned commissioners and the Brule Indians at Rosebud Agency, parties to this agreement, that the reservation for the Lower Brule Indians shall be located between the Rosebud Reservation and the Missouri River, it is hereby agreed that the reservation for the said Brule Indians, now at Lower Brule Agency, Dakota, and for such other Indians as may be assigned thereto, shall consist of all that part of township No. 103, range 72, west of the 5th principal meridian, in the Territory of Dakota, lying on the north bank of the White River, together with the tract of land bounded and described as follows, to wit:

Beginning at a point at low-water mark on the east bank of the Missouri River opposite the mouth of the said White River; thence down said east bank of the Missouri River along said low-water mark to a point opposite the mouth of Pratt Creek; thence due south to the forty-third parallel of latitude; thence west along said parallel to a point in longitude ninety-nine degrees and thirty minutes west; thence due north along the eastern boundary of Rosebud Reservation to the White River, and thence down said White River to the Missouri River, at the place of beginning. It is also agreed that said Indians shall receive all necessary aid from the government in their removal to said reservation, and when so removed each of said Indians shall be entitled to receive from the government the full value of all improvements, in buildings or on lands, owned by him at the time of such removal and lost to him thereby. Said compensation shall be made in such manner and on such appraisement as shall be ordered by the Secretary of the Interior.

Witness our hands and seals this 23rd day of January, 1883.

Newton Edmunds. [SEAL.]
James H. Teller. [SEAL.]
Peter C. Shannon. [SEAL.]

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:26 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 464
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
"How smooth must be the language of the whites, when they can make right look like wrong, and wrong like right."

Black Hawk

-Sauk leader who in 1832 led Fox and Sauk warriors against the united states.-

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:31 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
The Only Good Treaty...Is A Dead Treaty
2009

I was...I am...
I shall always be a Dakotah.
In my spirit… In my mind… and
In my heart I shall always be proud of my Dakotah People.
A brave and civilized People… A powerful Horse Nation.
The finest light cavalry the World has ever seen.
A Nation co-existing in peace and harmony with nature
and the world around them.
A Warrior Nation willing to share Peace or War with All.
No fear, to die in battle with one's enemies, a glorious honor,
Mother it is a good day to die!
A proud and courageous People… Lied to and Stolen from,
up to and including the Children.
Denied our Religion and Traditions… Denied our Language and Beliefs…
Denied our Children and Dakotah Way of Life…
Denied everything that Was.
A brave, proud People held hostage by this 'Great Democratic'
nation called the United State of America,
Right your wrongs America, honor the Treaties my People
signed in good faith.
Respect my People and their Right to a Way of Life that was here
upon this land long before your Ancestors were ever born.
My People will not go away…
We will not be annihilated… and will not be assimilated.
My People have endured Genocide…
We have overcome the poverty of the reservation…
The disease of alcoholism…
And the Bureau of Indian Affairs
One Day... the Sacred Circle
Of my People will once more be complete…
Simply because one hundred and nineteen years after the 1890
Massacre of Men, Women, Children and Old People at Wounded Knee…
I raise my children to be Dakotah
and walk proudly
In the Ways of Our Ancestors.
Honor your treaties America.
I was… I am
I shall always be a Dakotah.

AJ Milk

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:17 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
“The only good Indian I ever saw was a dead indian.”

General Philip Henry Sheridan

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:19 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
"I suppose I should be ashamed to say that I take the Western view of the Indian. I don't go so far as to think that the only good Indians are dead Indians, but I believe nine out of every ten are, and I shouldn't like to inquire too closely into the case of the tenth. The most vicious cowboy has more moral principle than the average Indian. Turn three hundred low families of New York into New Jersey, support them for fifty years in vicious idleness, and you will have some idea of what the Indians are. Reckless, revengeful, fiendishly cruel, they rob and murder, not the cowboys, who can take care of themselves, but the defenseless, lone settlers on the plains. As for the soldiers, an Indian chief once asked Sheridan for a cannon. "What! Do you want to kill my soldiers with it?" asked the general. "No," replied the chief, "want to kill the cowboy; kill soldier with a club."

Theodore Roosevelt
26th president of the united states

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 8:53 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
"Yonder sky that has wept tears of compassion upon my people for centuries untold, and which to us appears changeless and eternal, may change. Today is fair. Tomorrow it may be overcast with clouds.
My words are like the stars that never change. Whatever Seattle says, the great chief at Washington can rely upon with as much certainty as he can upon the return of the sun or the seasons.

The white chief says that Big Chief at Washington sends us greetings of friendship and goodwill. This is kind of him for we know he has little need of our friendship in return. His people are many. They are like the grass that covers vast prairies. My people are few. They resemble the scattering trees of a storm-swept plain. The great, and I presume -- good, White Chief sends us word that he wishes to buy our land but is willing to allow us enough to live comfortably. This indeed appears just, even generous, for the Red Man no longer has rights that he need respect, and the offer may be wise, also, as we are no longer in need of an extensive country.

There was a time when our people covered the land as the waves of a wind- ruffled sea cover its shell-paved floor, but that time long since passed away with the greatness of tribes that are now but a mournful memory. I will not dwell on, nor mourn over, our untimely decay, nor reproach my paleface brothers with hastening it, as we too may have been somewhat to blame.

Youth is impulsive. When our young men grow angry at some real or imaginary wrong, and disfigure their faces with black paint, it denotes that their hearts are black, and that they are often cruel and relentless, and our old men and old women are unable to restrain them. Thus it has ever been. Thus it was when the white man began to push our forefathers ever westward. But let us hope that the hostilities between us may never return. We would have everything to lose and nothing to gain. Revenge by young men is considered gain, even at the cost of their own lives, but old men who stay at home in times of war, and mothers who have sons to lose, know better.

Our good father in Washington--for I presume he is now our father as well as yours, since King George has moved his boundaries further north--our great and good father, I say, sends us word that if we do as he desires he will protect us. His brave warriors will be to us a bristling wall of strength, and his wonderful ships of war will fill our harbors, so that our ancient enemies far to the northward -- the Haidas and Tsimshians, will cease to frighten our women, children, and old men. He in reality he will be our father and we his children.

But can that ever be? Your God is not our God! Your God loves your people and hates mine! He folds his strong protecting arms lovingly about the paleface and leads him by the hand as a father leads an infant son. But, He has forsaken His Red children, if they really are His. Our God, the Great Spirit, seems also to have forsaken us. Your God makes your people wax stronger every day. Soon they will fill all the land.

Our people are ebbing away like a rapidly receding tide that will never return. The white man's God cannot love our people or He would protect them. They seem to be orphans who can look nowhere for help. How then can we be brothers? How can your God become our God and renew our prosperity and awaken in us dreams of returning greatness? If we have a common Heavenly Father He must be partial, for He came to His paleface children.

We never saw Him. He gave you laws but had no word for His red children whose teeming multitudes once filled this vast continent as stars fill the firmament. No; we are two distinct races with separate origins and separate destinies. There is little in common between us.

To us the ashes of our ancestors are sacred and their resting place is hallowed ground. You wander far from the graves of your ancestors and seemingly without regret. Your religion was written upon tablets of stone by the iron finger of your God so that you could not forget.

The Red Man could never comprehend or remember it. Our religion is the traditions of our ancestors -- the dreams of our old men, given them in solemn hours of the night by the Great Spirit; and the visions of our sachems, and is written in the hearts of our people.

Your dead cease to love you and the land of their nativity as soon as they pass the portals of the tomb and wander away beyond the stars. They are soon forgotten and never return.

Our dead never forget this beautiful world that gave them being. They still love its verdant valleys, its murmuring rivers, its magnificent mountains, sequestered vales and verdant lined lakes and bays, and ever yearn in tender fond affection over the lonely hearted living, and often return from the happy hunting ground to visit, guide, console, and comfort them.

Day and night cannot dwell together. The Red Man has ever fled the approach of the White Man, as the morning mist flees before the morning sun. However, your proposition seems fair and I think that my people will accept it and will retire to the reservation you offer them. Then we will dwell apart in peace, for the words of the Great White Chief seem to be the words of nature speaking to my people out of dense darkness.

It matters little where we pass the remnant of our days. They will not be many. The Indian's night promises to be dark. Not a single star of hope hovers above his horizon. Sad-voiced winds moan in the distance. Grim fate seems to be on the Red Man's trail, and wherever he will hear the approaching footsteps of his fell destroyer and prepare stolidly to meet his doom, as does the wounded doe that hears the approaching footsteps of the hunter.

A few more moons, a few more winters, and not one of the descendants of the mighty hosts that once moved over this broad land or lived in happy homes, protected by the Great Spirit, will remain to mourn over the graves of a people once more powerful and hopeful than yours.

But why should I mourn at the untimely fate of my people? Tribe follows tribe, and nation follows nation, like the waves of the sea. It is the order of nature, and regret is useless. Your time of decay may be distant, but it will surely come, for even the White Man whose God walked and talked with him as friend to friend, cannot be exempt from the common destiny. We may be brothers after all. We will see.

We will ponder your proposition and when we decide we will let you know. But should we accept it, I here and now make this condition that we will not be denied the privilege without molestation of visiting at any time the tombs of our ancestors, friends, and children. Every part of this soil is sacred in the estimation of my people. Every hillside, every valley, every plain and grove, has been hallowed by some sad or happy event in days long vanished.

Even the rocks, which seem to be dumb and dead as the swelter in the sun along the silent shore, thrill with memories of stirring events connected with the lives of my people, and the very dust upon which you now stand responds more lovingly to their footsteps than yours, because it is rich with the blood of our ancestors, and our bare feet are conscious of the sympathetic touch. Our departed braves, fond mothers, glad, happy hearted maidens, and even the little children who lived here and rejoiced here for a brief season, will love these somber solitudes and at eventide they greet shadowy returning spirits.

And when the last Red Man shall have perished, and the memory of my tribe shall have become a myth among the White Men, these shores will swarm with the invisible dead of my tribe, and when your children's children think themselves alone in the field, the store, the shop, upon the highway, or in the silence of the pathless woods, they will not be alone. In all the earth there is no place dedicated to solitude. At night when the streets of your cities and villages are silent and you think them deserted, they will throng with the returning hosts that once filled them and still love this beautiful land. The White Man will never be alone.

Let him be just and deal kindly with my people, for the dead are not powerless. Dead, did I say? - There is no death, only a change of worlds."

Seattle - Suquamish (18540

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 8:54 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
"In 1851 Seattle, chief of the Suquamish and other Indian tribes around Washington's Puget Sound, delivered what is considered to be one of the most beautiful and profound environmental statements ever made. The city of Seattle is named for the chief, whose speech was in response to a proposed treaty under which the Indians were persuaded to sell two million acres of land for $150,000."

Buckminster Fuller in Critical Path.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 4:52 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Yes its true I am a bad indian, because i still draw breath and i refuse to be assimilated.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 5:18 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 12:05 pm
Posts: 43
Location: deep in thought...
i wont go back to the white ways...

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I must walk the red path, it is the only one...


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 7:29 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
You know rt the best thing about being a "bad indian" is that I am teaching my children and other children of Dakotah Oyate to be "bad indians".

The words posted here are posted with one intent to inform the world of the generosity of the People of First Nations, to show the world that We are human beings and We are still here. One can look closely and see there is no guile or shame in the words of these First Nations men and true leaders of the People who fought to the death or were murdered for defending their Women and Children and a Way of Life that has existed since forever. Just as I feel no shame in using these very same words to inform the world of the Genocide that takes place everyday in the united states.

When have the Dakotahs ever started a war? We will not start this one but there are those of us in this generation willing to give our lives for the women and children and that land that sustains and nurtures us all... even if that means that our women and children become orphans and widows. I know what those medicine signs mean and I will honor them just as my Ancestors did. I am no coward and am willing to die for my beliefs and my Dakotah People.

With First Nations war is always a position of very last resort because we understand that it leaves widows and orphans that must be cared for. When have the Dakotahs ever started a war? We fight to death when we have no other recourse.

I have said it before and I will say it again... When it is the voices of your Aunties and your Nieces and Nephews crying in the cold and dark... then perhaps you will understand the pain in my heart and spirit AND my vow that they will take no more land.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 7:40 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
The children need examples of how true men conduct themselves. My children are generous and kind to a fault because I know what flows in their blood flows through mine, the blood of our Ancestors. Perhaps this will all end badly and the blood of Dakotah People will once again be spilled upon the land that we love. When that day comes I know I will not stand alone... and when I get to the other side I can look my mothers and my grandmothers in the face and say I did not forget you or those who are yet to come.

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