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 Post subject: Ojibwe and other First Nation's rights and wolves
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 11:53 am 

Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2009 4:53 pm
Posts: 641
Joe Rose Sr., a professor emeritus of Native American studies at Northland College in Ashland, Wis., and an elder of the Bad River Band, said in an interview that he saw a collision of world views. “We don’t have stories like Little Red Riding Hood, or the Three Little Pigs, or the werewolves of Transylvania,” he said. Wolf, or Ma’iingan, is a sacred creature, and so even keeping the population of wolves to minimum levels runs counter to traditional beliefs.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/13/scien ... ntemail1=y


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 Post subject: Re: Ojibwe and other First Nation's rights and wolves
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 1:46 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 9:06 pm
Posts: 216
Location: Iowa
I could never understand the concept of hunting for sport. As an “animal lover” I find this abhorrent and downright cruel. I remember years ago in the city where I reside they set aside a weekend in November to kill deer due to the city’s claim that they were overpopulating the area. You can imagine the glee of all those red-blooded American good ole boys when they heard about this. At the time I along with my two kids lived at the edge of town. We were taking a walk one November night during that time and heard the most anguished agonizing cries coming from the woods, almost human- like—very haunting and disturbing. Months later, in early spring, I was walking through those woods and came upon the carcass of a decomposing deer. I looked closely and saw an arrowhead lodged in her leg bone (since the slaughter was allocated within the city the hunters were to use bows and arrows). I thought back to that November night and of the cries and supposed they could have come from this deer. They didn’t even make sure she was out of her misery, just left her there to die, perhaps with her kin standing helplessly by. Shoot to kill; blood sport, decimating populations. When will it end?


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 Post subject: Re: Ojibwe and other First Nation's rights and wolves
PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 7:08 pm 

Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2009 4:53 pm
Posts: 641
http://usnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/ ... ators?lite


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 Post subject: Re: Ojibwe and other First Nation's rights and wolves
PostPosted: Thu Apr 05, 2012 7:19 pm 

Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2009 4:53 pm
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http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46918339/ns ... nvironment


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 Post subject: Re: Ojibwe and other First Nation's rights and wolves
PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2012 7:33 pm 

Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2009 4:53 pm
Posts: 641
lilac wrote:
I could never understand the concept of hunting for sport. As an “animal lover” I find this abhorrent and downright cruel. I remember years ago in the city where I reside they set aside a weekend in November to kill deer due to the city’s claim that they were overpopulating the area. You can imagine the glee of all those red-blooded American good ole boys when they heard about this. At the time I along with my two kids lived at the edge of town. We were taking a walk one November night during that time and heard the most anguished agonizing cries coming from the woods, almost human- like—very haunting and disturbing. Months later, in early spring, I was walking through those woods and came upon the carcass of a decomposing deer. I looked closely and saw an arrowhead lodged in her leg bone (since the slaughter was allocated within the city the hunters were to use bows and arrows). I thought back to that November night and of the cries and supposed they could have come from this deer. They didn't even make sure she was out of her misery, just left her there to die, perhaps with her kin standing helplessly by. Shoot to kill; blood sport, decimating populations. When will it end?


lilac,

I have hunted, something man has been doing since he first picked up a rock or stick to use as a weapon. But I have know two types of hunters. The first are sportsmen who love the planning and taking of a trip, figuring out the habits of the animals being hunted, the tracking or lying in wait for the game to appear. These people would never leave a wounded animal on the field but would spend the day(s) to put the animal out of its misery even if the meat was no longer good. The second type, well, they are just cold blooded killers (assholes) that use spotlights at night, hunt out of season although they didn't need the meat for food, or cut off the hind quarters and back-strap of a deer and leave the rest "because its rack wasn't big enough." Yup, assholes

"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated"---Ghandi


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 Post subject: Re: Ojibwe and other First Nation's rights and wolves
PostPosted: Fri Apr 06, 2012 9:32 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 23, 2011 7:17 pm
Posts: 327
Killing an animal just for the heck of it is wrong.The only time it is OK is when you and your family or others are hungry.We are killing animals every time we eat a piece of fried chicken or eat a hamburger.My husband killed a wild turkey one time and told the turkey he was sorry for what he did.I told him he sounded like the Indians.But that is what you are supposed to do.You are suppose to thank the animals for giving up their lives so that you might live.Jennifer


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