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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2011 10:33 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
"We do believe when children are removed that their spirit is left behind," said Riemers, program director of Indian Child Welfare for the Minneapolis American Indian Center.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/displa ... ster-care/

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2011 6:57 am 

Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:26 pm
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Pilamaya, Ghostwarrior.

In this vein, there is an interview here http://foodfreedom.wordpress.com/2011/1 ... more-11536 which is at the beginning of this topic by Elder Chief of the Mohawk which ties in well here...


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 12:38 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
“For what reason we have commenced this war, I will tell you. It is on account of Maj. Galbraith. We made a treaty with the government, and beg for what we do get, and can’t get that till our children are dying with hunger. “It is the traders who commenced it. Mr. A.J. Myrick told the Indians that they would eat grass or dirt. Then Mr. Forbes told the Lower Sioux that they were not men. Then Roberts was working with his friends to defraud us out of our moneys…”

Taoyateduta (His Red Nation) - Dakota

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 12:46 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
The Redwood Gazette December 26, 1862 stories of the Sioux Uprising & of the 38 Sioux Indians Hanged in Mankato, MN.

Long Overdue Cash Came Day Too Late To Prevent Uprising

Preliminaries to the uprising of the Dakotah Indians took Place at both agencies in August, events that should have given serious thought to government officials.

Both events stemmed from tardy annuity payments, due in June but not arriving until August 18, the day the uprising began.

The Dakotas suffered through a bad winter. Game had not been plentiful for the blanket Indians, and the crops of the farmer Indians had been bad.

Emergency government rations saved many from starvation. Settlers and government workers gave out food from their private stocks. Traders extended credit.

Dakotahs placed their hope on the annuity. Upper tribes delayed annual buffalo hunts to wait at Upper Agency for money to buy food. They ate most of their dogs and many of their horses while they waited.

Surliness was the rule about Lower Agency.

Agent T.J. Galbraith refused to parcel out regular food allotments until the money arrived. He requested soldiers for protection against the large camp at Upper Agency. Answering his call, Lt. Timothy J. Sheehan and 50 men of Company C. Fifth Minnesota Volunteer regiment, marched down from Fort Ripley and reinforces by a detachment of Fort Ridgley troops under Lt. Thomas P. Gere, stationed themselves at the Upper Agency.

Trouble came August 4. The troops found themselves surrounded by scores of armed braves, most of the arms pointed unerringly at the white soldiers. Indians quickly battered down the door to the big stone warehouse and as quickly scurried away with sides of pork and sacks of flour.

The looting attracted the attention of the massed braves long enough for the soldiers to unlimber two small cannon, which they zeroed in on the warehouse door, fuses ready.

That broke up the looting and a parley was called. Three days later Capt. John S. Marsh, Fort Ridgely commandant, and Rev. Stephen R. Riggs from nearby Hazelwood mission, persuaded Galbraith to issue supplies.

The Upper Indians returned to their camp sites, many of the northern bands started on a belated buffalo hunt.

This helped the Lower Indians not at all, however.

Galbraith arrived at Lower agency August 11 with a company of men he had recruited from the area. The men called themselves Renville Rangers but were to become Company I, Tenth Minnesota, as soon as they reached Fort Snelling. More than half the company were mixed bloods.

Burning because they could not get supplies as the Upper Indians had, Lower chiefs called Galbraith to a council in the agency square. Most of the traders also attended.

Galbraith could not tell them why the money was so late. Nor could he give them any more rations. Perhaps, he suggested, the traders could extend credit.

Feeling that was never good between trader and Indian customer was running worse. The late annuity payment was hurting the traders too. They had earlier decided not to extend credit, which the Indians seemed to feel was theirs as a natural right. Bitter words had passed more than once between traders and Indians.

“No more credit,” the traders reiterated. “But our people are hungry,” protested chiefs.

“If they are hungry, let them eat grass,” was part of the answer Andrew Myrick retorted.

The angry chiefs stalked home. The following day Galbraith and the Renville Rangers moved on to Fort Ridgely.

The new recruits left the fort Sunday, August 17. The word of the uprising reached them at St. Peter late Monday.

Words of the Lower Agency council came back to haunt the white man.

Myrick died the first day, his dead mouth was stuffed with grass.

That Chief Little Crow remembered the council is evident. In a letter to Brig. Gen Henry H Sibley after peace overtures were made following the Battle of Birch Coulie, the chief wrote: “For what reason we have commenced this war, I will tell you. It is on account of Maj. Galbraith. We made a treaty with the government, and beg for what we do get, and can’t get that till our children are dying with hunger. “It is the traders who commenced it. Mr. A.J. Myrick told the Indians that they would eat grass or dirt. Then Mr. Forbes told the Lower Sioux that they were not men. Then Roberts was working with his friends to defraud us out of our moneys…”

The annual money reached Fort Ridgely the day the Dakotahs burned Lower Agency. It arrived too late to stop the devastation.

Source: The Redwood Gazette December 26, 1862





Hangings, May End Tension Mob Violence


The tension that has prevailed since the end of the Sioux uprising should lessen somewhat after the hangings today, predicts Col. Stephen Miller, commanding officer of the Seventh Minnesota Volunteer Regiments and Commandant of the Indian prison at Mankato.

Feelings has run high, he points out, in both directions. Those opposed to capital punishment are protesting loudly, but are scarcely heard in the roar of the opposite extremists who want death for all Indians. In between are the moderates who judge most of the confined Indians as prisoners of war.

Soldiers have had to deal on several occasions with the bitter animosity held toward the Indians by civilians. While Brigadier General Henry H. Sibley, now commander of the Minnesota department of the United States army, was marching the prisoners from Lower Agency to Mankato they and the small retinue of squaws, brought along to do the cooking, were set upon by a mob at New Ulm. The fettered prisoners were unable to defend themselves, and several soldiers were hurt, none seriously, in holding back the irate crowd.

At Mankato about three weeks ago Col. Miller stopped a mob of about 200 men who had gathered from several saloons and tramped to the prison intent on lynching the prisoners.

Lt. Col. William R. Marshall, Seventh regiment executive officer, encountered a mob at Henderson when his soldiers marched through there enroute to the winter camp at Fort Snelling with the 1,500 Indian women and children and the few men not convicted by the military commission. There a white woman grabbed an Indian baby from its mother’s arms and dashed it to the ground so violently it died a few hours later.

Officials other than Col. Miller have expressed great concern for the possible violence resulting from this strong anti-Indian feeling. Gen. Sibley in an official dispatch said that pardoning any of the prisoners would enrage citizens into a “determined effort to get (the prisoner) in possession, which will be resented, and may cost the lives of thousands of our citizens.”

Governor Alexander Ramsey wrote to President Abraham Lincoln, then going over the military commissions’ findings. “I hope the execution of every Sioux condemned by the military court will at once be ordered. It would be wrong upon principle and policy to refuse this. Private revenge would on all this border take the place of official judgment on these Indians.”

Also writing to President Lincoln, Gen. John Pope, commander of the Northwest department, reported, “…if the guilty are not executed I think it nearly impossible to prevent the indiscriminate massacre of all the Indians … (including the) 1,500 women and children and innocent old men prisoners.”

But apparently President Lincoln did not take the advice of these officials. Possibly he listened more closely to Indian Commissioner William P. Dole, who said,”…indiscriminate punishment of men who have laid down their arms and surrendered themselves as prisoners (would be) a stain upon our national character and a source of future regret.”

After going over the commission records, he found, the president told congress, that only two of the prisoners had been proved guilty of rape, and only 40 were connected with “wanton murder of unarmed citizens.” He ordered 39 to be executed, later reprieved another, and the 38 were hanged today. The rest were judged prisoners of war.

The predicted mass violence has not come to pass, and is less likely to as the memories of the horrors of the outbreak gradually diminish.

Source: The Redwood Gazette December 26, 1862





38 Sioux Uprisers Hanged 268 Others, Granted Reprieves By Lincoln, Watch From Log Prison


Thirty-eight Indians and mixed bloods were hanged simultaneously at 10 a.m. today at Mankato, judged guilty of crimes committed during the Sioux outbreak in August and September.

Remaining imprisoned are 268 others, sentenced to death earlier by a military commission but reprieved by President Abraham Lincoln. They watched the execution through chinks between the logs of their prison building.

The condemned prisoners marched in a single file from the prison to the huge scaffold, their faces covered with muslin caps, their hands lashed tightly before them.

Led by the provost marshal, they stumbled up the steps. Soldiers led the doomed men beneath the dangling nooses, then slipped the ropes over the covered heads. The scaffold is square, built to accommodate 40 at a time around it circumference. But President Lincoln ordered the deaths of only 39, and just before Christmas another, Tatemina, was respited. The two empty nooses twitched in the chill air.

Around the scaffold and at a distance, lines of soldiers stood at attention-infantry and cavalry. Beyond them was the crowd which had come to witness the hangings. Some were there who had lost families to the men whose faces were covered, lost relatives, friends, home and money. Others had been no nearer the outbreak than 50 miles. Others came for the occasion from points east.

Largely the spectators were serious, though there had been jokes and laughter in the cold air earlier, before the prisoners had come forth. Colonel Stephen Miller, prison commandant, closed all liquor establishments for the day. The crowd was sober.

Almost on cue the doomed men broke into the “hi-yi-yi” of the Dakota death chant. They swayed back and forth, moving the scaffold with them. The provost marshal shouted them down.

Then they broke into discordant yelling. Interpreters said some were protesting the wearing of caps over their faces. Some were shouting their own names and the names of others of the condemned, and repeating “I am here!”

By swinging their bound arms side to side, a few managed to grasp the hands of those next to them. The provost marshal and soldiers hurried from the scaffold.

10 a.m.

The crowd and Indians alike fell silent as a drummer boomed out three slow rolling beats. The crowd seemed to sense the tenseness the Indians must have felt inside their masks. The Indians started shouting again.

The third rolling drum beat ended. Provost Marshal Joseph R. Brown dropped his hands, the signal. William J. Dudley of Lake Shetek, two of whose children died in the outbreak and whose wife is still missing, nervously tried to cut the trap door rope with a long knife. He missed clumsily he tried again.

The rope parted and all 40 trap doors sprang. Ropes jerked with the sudden weight, grasping hands were rudely parted, shouts were choked off. A cheer from the crowd straggled into the breath-fogged air.

A rope broke and a body dropped in a heap on the frozen ground. The neck was broken but the body was hanged again.

10:10 a.m.

The last Indian was declared dead. He was cut down and laid beside the others.

Carts carried the bodies to the bank of the Blue Earth river where two large graves had been scratched among the willows. Covered with blankets, the bodies were deposited.

Final prayers were, said by the missionaries – Episcopalian, Presbyterian, and Roman Catholic – who had baptized all but two a few days earlier.

Dirt and sand was hastily thrown over the forms. The burial party scurried away, leaving only a couple of curious onlookers.

The willows bobbed in the wind, the same wind that was blowing over shallow graves dotting the blackened prairies and hidden in now quiet valleys of the upper Minnesota, graves of victims of the outbreak five months ago.

Source: The Redwood Gazette December 26, 1862

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 5:26 am 

Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:26 pm
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Hau, Ghostwarrior,

I am filled with shame every time I read this account, for the people who did this thing. The parallels between then and now are very evident...


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 9:30 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
The Department of Interior and the american People had their chance... it is time for the special rappatour from the International Criminal Court to begin prosecuting officials of both state and federal agencies for the crime of Ethnic Cleansing.

http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/us-off ... 3ce6c.html

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:44 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
We dont need no damn summit what we need is the special rapporteur of the International Criminal Court to investigate, indict and convict some of these united states state and federal officials for their crimes of Ethnic Cleansing.... then the american People and officials at the state and federal level would know they can't do whatever they want to Native Nations and Peoples.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2011 12:20 pm 
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I heard recently of a boy being taking away from his mother because he was too fat.His mother said she tried feeding him right.Children are often taking away for stupid reasons like this, when they are much better off at home.Some people have metabolism problems.The way our society is, tempting people with all these junk foods and expect you to be healthy.Most of our foods are poison.Most food companies do not care about us. Only the money. People need to be taught about nutrition instead of taking their child away.Most people just do not know what foods are bad for us. We need our garden vegetables and fruits.That is the best for us.It also does not help that the tap water is bad.We need pure water to heal us.Children needs to be with their families. When they are taken away they are never the same. They become broken.It breaks my heart.Jennifer


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:06 am 
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Location: Zeeland, North Dakota
Craig wrote:
I heard recently of a boy being taking away from his mother because he was too fat.His mother said she tried feeding him right.Children are often taking away for stupid reasons like this, when they are much better off at home.Some people have metabolism problems.The way our society is, tempting people with all these junk foods and expect you to be healthy.Most of our foods are poison.Most food companies do not care about us. Only the money. People need to be taught about nutrition instead of taking their child away.Most people just do not know what foods are bad for us. We need our garden vegetables and fruits.That is the best for us.It also does not help that the tap water is bad.We need pure water to heal us.Children needs to be with their families. When they are taken away they are never the same. They become broken.It breaks my heart.Jennifer


When child welfare is left under the hand of a government agency the result is children raised by a committee. Think of a camel as being a horse designed by a committee.

Government aide usually caries with it loss of personal responsibility and factory designed Children. When a Government agency says "In the Best interest of the child" it really means "We own you and yours"

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2011 7:24 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
https://www.change.org/petitions/south- ... n-children

I ask humbly that you please sign and share this petition to save Dakota, Lakota and Nakota Children from being colonized and assimilated by the american People of the state of south dakota. I think of my own small children who were ruthlessly stripped from me by the united states bureau of indian affairs, the northern plains intertribal court of appeal and the bureau of indian affairs federal police and it took years to get them back. I ask this thing in the name of those who cannot defend themselves these small innocent ones... who are the future of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota Peoples and Nation. Pidamaya.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2011 9:27 pm 
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I,as a grandmother, plead with anyone who has a heart to please sign the petition to save the Dakota,Lakota, and Nakota children from being taken away from their families.There are also other children in America being taken away for no reason,as are the Indian children, only to be put in the hands of someone who wants them as slaves or to be killed or to be sexually abused by some pervert.They want to destroy the family.Please sign the petition.Jennifer


Last edited by Craig on Fri Dec 30, 2011 7:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 7:17 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 1:39 pm
Posts: 87
Location: Traditional homeland of the Shawnee
Ghostwarrior, I have put my "mark" on this petition. It is the right thing to do. May we get enough names to get some action. Keep up the fight for our children and grandchildren


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 8:33 pm 

Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2009 4:08 pm
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Location: north carolina
done my friend, hopefully we will get all these issues straightened up


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 10:50 pm 
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Thanks, to the ones that have signed the petition for our babies.I am still asking again for Ghostwarrior.Please sign the petition.Jennifer


Last edited by Craig on Sat Dec 31, 2011 1:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2011 1:38 pm 

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GW, anything you ask that is within my power to do I will do and this is certainly within my power to do. I signed on the 30th and will send out on my e-mail list today.

For what it's worth to any that hesitate, I have signed many petitions with Change.org and have never received any junk mail as a result, other petitions but not junk. Frankly I don't know how I missed this one in my inbox.


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 8:30 pm 
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Will anyone else sign to help Indian children not be taken away from their people?Jennifer


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 2:22 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
"Dear Sir, It is with a feeling of sorrow that I write you telling of the death of your daughter, Lizzie. She was sick but a short time and we did not think her so near her end. Last Wednesday I was called away to Minneapolis and I was very much surprised upon my return Saturday evening to find she was dead, as they had given us no information except she might live for a number of months. Those that were with her say she did not suffer, but passed away as one asleep. I am very sorry that you could not have seen your daughter alive, for she had grown quite a little and improved very much since you let her come here with me. If we had known she was going to live but so short a time, we would have made a great effort to have gotten you here before she died. "

Superintendent of Flandreau Indian School to the father of a Indian student who died of tuberculosis in a government boarding school in 1907

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 2:45 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
"In our tradition and culture, the sacred hoop is very important. When relatives are lost to a family, it hurts the entire nation." Chief Arvol Looking Horse - Lakota

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 2:53 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
The theft of Dakota, Lakota and Nakota Children is long and well documented and its long past time for the american People to stop stealing the Children of our Nation. How much longer will the world community of Nations stand aside and let the americans ethnically cleanse our Nation and People from the face of the planet?

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 3:45 pm 
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One day the injustices of the children will stop.We must continue with our prayers and continue fighting for our little ones.They are ones closest to God and so are our elders.We must also continue to help our elderly for they get taken advantage of.They have a hard time taking care of themselves.We need to go by and check on them from time to time and help them if they need help.I need to do this more often myself .So many times I get caught up in my life or I am too tired from work.We have no excuses to help others.Jennifer


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