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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 12:21 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Greed can be a powerful Ally my friend... if used properly against those who practice this practice.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2011 7:33 pm 
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Location: Zeeland, North Dakota
ghostwarrior wrote:
Greed can be a powerful Ally my friend... if used properly against those who practice this practice.


It took me a few minutes to realize what you are saying. Very strong words of wisdom. the best weapon is when you can cause the enemies own methods into weapons against them.

A visual representation of what you just said:

Image

May you turn their own weapon towards them.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2011 6:06 am 
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Yes, - my methods exactly. Beat them at their own game. That's the way to win. But we don't need to do anything to them. They'll do it to themselves given the proper motivation. :lol:

I made it out to Lakota Oyate but it was a whirlwind trip. Met a few people. Had a great interview. (Too short!) And now I'm planning my next trip. Have to, Have to take the family this time.

Hope you all are well.

P.S. Got the book and the CD to learn Lakota Language. I can't wait to start. Learning from YouTube takes too long. :idea:

P.S. You know it's the Polish people selling those guns to the madmen. Not that we'd ever use them on ourselves or each other. ... ;)

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Mon Jun 27, 2011 10:42 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Once again the Pick Sloan Act and the dams that were built out of that act are coming into play in the lives of Crow Creek Dakota Oyate citizens.

The Water Treatment Facility at Crow Creek is about to be rendered inoperable by the united states army corps of engineers opening the flood release gates at the big bend dam because the water intake for the water treatment facility is located just upstream from the emergency spillway which is releasing 1.2 million gallons of water per second. This large amount of water flowing over the intake has clogged filters with fine sand and sediment which is being carried by this huge amount of water that MUST be released.

THREE THOUSAND PEOPLE are about to be without drinking water.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 1:58 pm 
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Location: Traditional homeland of the Shawnee
The whites dictate to people on what they should do. They also try to dictate what nature should do. It is unfortunate relatives are caught in the battle between the us government and nature. Know my prayers are with you in this battle. I hope things get better soon


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2011 3:08 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
http://www.keloland.com/news/news/flood ... ?ID=117168

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2011 1:12 am 

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ghostwarrior wrote:
It would appear the blacks are also liars and thieves. Did not the attempted land theft at Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and extortion of 2 MILLION DOLLARS from the poorest People in america happen under the obama administration? i am not a young tribal chairman to be taken advantage of by seasoned bia bureaucrats and driven around like a golf cart... i am a dakod wicasa of 44 winters and i understand that assimilation has a new face and a new vocabulary.


Why are you collectively lumping the actions of one man into a race? Please understand that most blacks don't trust the government either and are full aware of its tricks. Obama is no more than a puppet man controlled by powerful bureaucrats and businessmen like every other American president since the Reagan administration. I don’t think it’s fair to lump all of one race into one category. Obama is like many blacks who easily assimilate into white cultures. However, his actions do not speak for all blacks nor do all blacks trust him. He happened to be the better of the two candidates in the 2008 elections. I would hate to think what would’ve happened if McCain go it. It surely would’ve caused a greater crisis then the one that exist.

As for the on going tribal conflicts with the American government I sincerely hope the Lakota and the Native American race preservers, gains back lands, and cultural rights. I know of many of the fraudulent practices that the government uses to prohibit the progress of the indigenous man. I however am not surprised by the actions of the government. There is a similar crisis going on in mainstream America that is attempting to trap blacks in a similar predicament to the indigenous. They are trying to privatize education and close all public schools. That would effectively eliminate 80% of all black children from education. So I do relate with this situation and hope the reservation has some good lawyers. I am sure they do.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Jul 01, 2011 1:25 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Wali

There is a difference between tribal conflicts and Nation to Nation conflicts.

As for obama he is nothing more and nothing less than what he is and always will be in my eyes... a buffalo soldier. The efforts and legislation that his administration is putting forth as advancements are nothing more than very slick manipulations to further colonize the hearts and minds of the citizens of Native Nations. I am a Dakota Citizen with rights and responsibilites that predate the united states and her melted pot immigrant People.

Thank you for your well wishes my friend... be well.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 10:30 am 
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Tatanka Iyotaka Speech to us senate committee in 1862

The Reverend T.L. Riggs, of the Dakota Mission at Oahe, had called public attention to the disgraceful manner in which the agreement of 1882 had been forced upon the Standing Rock Sioux, and the scandal had to be investigated to save the face of the administration. So, not long after Sitting Bull began to work his garden at the agency, five stuffed shirts arrived from Washington, making an elaborate pretense of listening to the many grievances of the starving Sioux. These were the Honorable H.L. Dawes, of Massachussets, the Honorable John A. Logan, of Illinois, the Honorable Angus Cameron, of Wisconsin, the Honorable John T. Morgan, of Alabama, and the Honorable George G. Vest, of Missouri- a “select committee of the Senate sent to investigate the condition of the Indian tribes of Montana and Dakota.”
The council room was crowded with Sioux. The spokesmen were three: John Grass, chief of the Blackfeet Sioux, and two Hunkpapa, Running Antelope and Sitting Bull. The Upper and Lower Yanktonais at Standing Rock had no spokesmen. For, as McLaughlin puts it, “Were it not for the intimidation of the arrogant and aggressive Hunkpapa and Blackfeet of this agency, the Yanktonais could soon be brought to anything required of them.” Such yes men could have no grievances; there was no point in letting them talk.
The report of this Select Committee is one of the funniest documents in all the files of the minutes of Indian councils-and that is saying a good deal. It reads like the Trial Scene in Alice in Wonderland. The Senators snapped out one question after another, questions entirely unrelated to the answers previously given, and they soon had poor John Grass bewildered. The Indians went into their grievances at some length, and the committee as steadily ignored their remarks and kept hounding the Sioux as to whether or not they wished to earn the money (already due them), and whether they would try to earn it, if the Grandfather ever sent them the tools and seed and machinery promised them so many years before. It is quite clear that the committee cared nothing whatever for the Indians or their troubles, but were merely preparing a document for printing which would read well on the frontier and whitewash the commission of 1882.
That agreement of 1882, however, was one of the grievances, and before he became utterly confused by the irrelevant questions of the committee, John Grass managed to tell the Senators some very pungent truths as to the manner in which the Indians had been handled:
Those men talked a great deal, and we were bewildered. It was not with willing hearts we signed… Those men fairly made my head dizzy, and my signing was an accident… The white men talked in a threatening way, and the crowd of Indians behind me got frightened and rushed up and signed the paper… Bishop Marty stood before us and told us if we did not sign it, we might as well take a knife and stab ourselves… That is what frightened the Indians. And he told us also if we did not sign we would be displeasing God… All these men here know that was they reason the signed…
That sort of thing might not read so well. And so the Senators hurried the Indians along, confusing the issue. Others of the agency group caught their spirit, and when Red Fish, a dignified old man, got up to explain matters, a sergeant of the Indian Police told him he “looked as if he had been drinking whiskey, and had better sit down.” Red Fish sat down. No member of the committee rebuked that sergeant.
Sitting Bull had not been told the purpose of this committee. Then, as always, the agent “kept him blind.” It was all part of the recognized process of “breaking” a chief. Therefore, when Sitting Bull saw the commissioners dodging the issue, talking at random, and confusing John Grass, he concluded that they were there to fleece his people once more. Their manner did not suggest friendship.
Running Antelope saw the chief becoming restive, and expressed the hope that “whoever talks to these men from the Grandfather, will talk quietly and in friendly terms… I want everybody to use such language that no fault can be found with any of us hereafter.” He knew it was time for Sitting Bull to speak.
So did the chairman. And he also knew how Sitting Bull had heckled “Star” Terry in Canada. That rankled in the official heart. And so the chairman tried to browbeat Sitting Bull. He did not know what he was biting off.

Here is the official report, verbatim:

Chairman (to the interpreter): Ask Sitting Bull if he has anything to say to the committee.

Sitting Bull: Of course I will speak if you desire me to do so. I suppose it is only such men as you desire to speak who must say anything.

Chairman: We supposed the Indians would select men to speak for them. But any man who desires to speak, or any man the Indians here desire shall talk for them, we will be glad to hear if he has anything to say.

Sitting Bull: Do you not know who I am, that you speak as you do?

Chairman: I know that you are Sitting Bull, and if you hae anything to say, we will be glad to hear you.

Sitting Bull: Do you recognize me; do you know who I am?

Chairman: I know you are Sitting Bull.

Sitting Bull: You say you know I am Sitting Bull but do you know what position I hold?
Chairman: I do not know any difference between you and the other Indians at this agency.

Sitting Bull: I am here by the will of the Great Spirit, and by His will I am a chief. My heart is red and sweet, and I know it is sweet, because whatever passes near me puts out its tongue to me; and yet you men have come here to talk with us, and you say you do not know who I am. I want to tell you that if the Great Spirit has chosen anyone to be the chief ot his country, it is myself.

Chairman: In whatever capacity you may be here today, if you desire to say anything to us we will listen to you; otherwise we will dismiss the council.

Sitting Bull stood there, proud of his high office, of his great nation, facing these pretentious representatives of the people which had cheated his Sioux children so often. He saw they cared nothing for the Sioux, and he thought they had a trick up their sleeves. And nothing convinced him of their duplicity so much as the fact that they refused to recognize as chief the only Sioux who could not be hornswoggled, and swindled, the only Sioux alive who could stand up to an official, look him in the eye, and tell him he lied. Running Antelope-all soft soap and smoothness; John Grass, easily bewildered and stampeded into signing a paper against his better judgement; the yes men Yanktonais, who would do anything required of them. Sitting Bull naturally supposed that anyone who would not treat with him as chief must wish to do the Sioux mischief; there could be no other explanation.
And so they denied that he was chief, said he was just a common Indian, did they? They said they would dismiss the council unless he spoke as a private individual? Hehan! Well, well! He would have to show them who was chief.

The official mintues go on:

Sitting Bull: Yes, that is all right, You have conducted yourselves like men who have been drinking whiskey, and I came here to give you some advice. (Here Sitting Bull waved his hand, and at once the Indians left the room in a body.)

The Select Committee were left alone with their interpreter, stenographer, and clerk. Major McLaughlin was also present, and if he had imagined himself dominant on that reservation, he had his eyes wide open now. It was a bad quarter of an hour for the Major, with disgruntled senators all over the place.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 10:35 am 
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What i personally would like to know is how patrick duffy the bia superintendent of the Crow Creek agency is allowed to lobby for favorable leases for white farmers and ranchers and why is bia police captain scott shields still on the job after numerous resolutions asking him to be removed from his offical duties as chief federal law enforcement officer of the Crow Creek agency?

Where is the oversight from the bureau of indian affairs and the senate select committee on indian affairs?

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:35 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Major George P. Ahern to General ------------,
June 20, 1929
The Woodley Apartments, 1851 Columbia Road
Washington, D.C. June 20, 1929

General ------------ -------------,
War Department
Washington, D.C.

Dear General:
It is with a feeling of deep regret that I find myself unable to accept your kind invitation to meet at luncheon your Indian guest, Red Tomahawk. My reason for this action is as follows. My first station upon leaving West Point in 1882 was Fort Randall, Dakota Territory, where Sitting Bull and 154 followers were held as prisoners in a camp adjoining the post. At the request of the Commanding Officer I took charge of Sitting Bull’s mail, translating his French and German letters for him.
For several months I was in daily contact with Sitting Bull, and learned to admire him for his many fine qualities. Indian chiefs from all over the Sioux Territory came to seek his advice. I was always asked by Sitting Bully to attend these conferences, and found them most interesting, as they showed the deep respect in which Sitting Bull was held by his people.
During the Indian campaign of 1890 and ’91 I was in the field with my regiment in eastern Montana and was shocked to learn at that time of Sitting Bull’s death. I learned of the details from several sources, all of which indicated that he was killed while unarmed and offering no resistance. It was reported that an Indian policeman by the name of Red Tomahawk was the man who shot Sitting Bull. In my search for details of this incident I find no hint at a justification for the killing of this Indian chief. It was reported that there was some shooting preceding Sitting Bull’s death, but of no great importance and such as could have been easily handled by the police detachment present at the time.
Hence my inability to accept your kind invitation,
Very respectfully yours,


(Signed) George P. Ahern,
Major, U.S.A., Retired


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 12:04 pm 
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Where is the "honor" in in subjugating the People of our Native Nations by serving the colonial government of the united states and enforcing united states laws on the lands of Dakota, Lakota and Nakota Nations?
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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 3:53 pm 
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http://www.mitchellrepublic.com/event/article/id/55321/

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 4:01 am 

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"If I agree to dispose of any part of our land to the white people, I would feel guilty of taking food away from our children's mouths, and I do not wish to be that man."
(Sitting Bull)


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 4:44 pm 
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A great victory for the People of Crow Creek Dakota Oyate as tribal chairman duane big eagle is convicted today on 3 or 4 counts in united states federal court.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 7:41 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
it would appear that Nation to Nation status does not extend to what the americans call south dakota as that state built on Dakota and Lakota lands is sending representatives of the state of south dakota department of social services to do well child checks on children in Crow Creek Dakota Oyate. no other Nation in the world would stand aside and let their children be removed by a foreign power.

it seems to me the state of south dakota is not a Nation and has no right whatsoever to cross onto the Sovereign Territory of a Dakota Nation that predates the united states and certainly what is known as the state of south dakota by tens of thousands of years. taking the Dakota Children of Crow Creek and placing them in white foster homes is an act of war and also an act of Ethnic Cleansing.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2011 8:24 pm 
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Rattling Runner - 1862

"I am for continuing the war, and am opposed to the delivery of the prisoners. I have no confidence that the whites will stand by any agreement they make if we give them up. Ever since we treated with them, their agents and traders have robbed and cheated us. Some of our people have been shot, some hung; others placed upon floating ice and drowned; and many have been starved in their prisons.

It was not the intention of the nation to kill any of the whites until after the few returned from Acton and told what they had done. When they did this, all the young men became excited, and commenced the massacre. The older ones would have prevented it if they could, but since the treaties, they have lost all their influence. We may regret what has happened but the matter has gone too far to be remedied. We have got to die. Let us, then, kill as many of the whites as possible, and let the prisoners die with us."

"The braves say they will not give you the captives. The Mdewakantons are men, and therefore as long as one of them lives they will not stop pointing their guns at the Americans."

Rattling Runner



It seems to me the americans have forgotten who We are and Where We come from...it seems they have forgotten who fought the Dakota War of 1862 and that the blood of our Ancestors runs strong and true in many of us who still live and think Dakota. it also my thought that many Dakota People in Crow Creek have forgotten or even worse been colonized and corrupted by american society and ideals... a terrible thing to see the result of Dakota People that are neither Dakota or american yet i see with my own eyes and feel in my own heart that more remember with each passing of the sun.

i also understand that those colonized "dakotas" who stand in the way and choose to be involved with circles of corruption will be swept aside with the americans and their foreign ideals of what it means to be a good human being... for what was done here at Crow Creek must never be allowed to happen again.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 10:01 pm 
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The Testing of the Chiefs



THE FOUR CHIEFS created by the Hunkpapa in 1851 had not lived up to the expectations of the tribe. Hard times always bring criticism of government, and the Sioux had been having difficulty in feeding themselves. Cold weather, wars, and broken treaties may also have counted against the leaders. It was the general opinion that the experiment had not proved a great success. But worst of all, the chiefs themselves seemed not to have the dignity and forbearance demanded of men in their high office.

Running Antelope had run away to the Ree village with another man's wife; Red Horn had stolen two women from the same man, Bear-Skinned, one of his own warriors; Loud-Voiced Hawk became involved in a fatal stabbing affray. Even Four Horns, Sitting Bull's uncle, was being criticized. Some of the head men got together and decided that something must be done to test these chiefs and find out whether they were fit for office, or not.

A chief (I-tan'-chan) was supposed to be greathearted, magnanimous, generous, and above all personal spite or selfishness. For this reason, few men were willing to undertake the responsibility. It was asking too much to forgive everything, never to lose one's temper, and continually to give and share with those who could never by any chance repay benefits. Most men had not enough of the father in them to be father to a whole tribe. Famous warriors — like the Cheyenne Roman Nose — sometimes declined chieftaincy — not feeling themselves fit for it. Among the Sioux, men were sometimes made chiefs for their lovable, gentle qualities, even though they were hardly warriors at all. Black Eagle, of the Sans Arc Sioux, is an example. Great warriors sometimes lacked the kindly qualities demanded of a civil chief.



When the Hunkpapa head men assembled, they devised a plan for testing the chiefs who had so grievously fallen from grace and displayed the weaknesses and passions of ordinary men. It was agreed that a sure way to test these chiefs would be to steal their wives and see how they took it. Therefore, certain men were secretly appointed for this job and sent to the scattered camps where the four chiefs were then living.

As had been expected, Running Antelope, Loud-Voiced-Hawk, and Red Horn all lost their tempers when they found men meddling with their wives, and one of them even went gunning for the disturber of his domestic peace. The head men nodded; it had turned out just as they expected. And now it was the turn of Four Horns.

One day the wife of Four Horns left his tipi without saying where she was going. All day she was missing, but Four Horns made no inquiries. It was not the part of a chief to disturb himself about a woman. Night fell, and she did not come back. He sat in the lodge alone, but made no effort to find out what had become of his woman.

Early in the morning, the wife of one of the Hunkpapa came into the tipi of the lonely chief. Said she, "I wish to marry you. I have long wished to do so, for you are a great chief, and have performed many brave deeds. Besides," she added, "my husband has stolen your wife; he has her now."

Four Horns sat still. He said nothing, nor did he betray any emotion whatever. She watched him, and after a few moments went to work preparing breakfast for the chief. When the meat was cooked, she cut it up, and, sitting before him, fed him with her own hands — four morsels. He ate the food she had prepared for him. The woman remained in his lodge that day.

A little before sunset, when the rays struck through the yellow lodge-skins and dimmed the small fire in the middle of the tipi, someone came to the door of the tipi and coughed, to let Four Horns know he was there. Four Horns asked him to enter. It was a messenger from the man who had stolen the chief's wife. He said, "My friend wants his wife back."



Then Four Horns got up and went out of the lodge and caught his best war horse and brought it to the tipi and put on its back his finest saddle. The saddles of that family were celebrated among the Hunkpapa, for Sitting Bull's uncle, Looks-for-Home, was an excellent saddler.

Over the saddle he threw a decorated buffalo robe, and put his best bridle on the horse's head. Then he called the woman out of the lodge and placed her in the saddle. "Certainly," said the chief, "if my cousin wants his wife again, he may have her. Let there be no hard feelings between us."

The woman went back to her husband, riding the fine gift horse. Four Horns went back into his lodge, and soon after his own wife returned to him. He said nothing to her about her desertion, but treated her just as if nothing had happened. His relations with the man who had stolen her remained friendly as before.

Then the head men of the Hunkpapa, who had planned the testing of the chiefs, rejoiced. Four Horns had justified his election. He alone, of the four, had shown the great heart of a real chief. Henceforth, though the others were chiefs in name, Four Horns was regarded by the people as supreme.

But Four Horns was not happy. He was terribly ashamed and humiliated, because his three colleagues had brought such disgrace upon their high office — which he shared. He thought long, and then decided that he would create a chief who should restore the honor of the chieftaincy and wipe away the tarnish from that office. He looked about for the right man, and he did not need to look long.

Four Horns had children of his own, sons who might have been chiefs after him. Also he had adopted two young men — Noisy-Walking-Elk and Red Arse. But he passed them all by. His choice fell upon the chief of the Midnight Strong Hearts, his nephew, Sitting Bull. His qualifications made him the only candidate.

Sitting Bull: there was a young man who was brave, who usually led the charges on his fast horses, and never reined them back in a battle. A man who had been severely wounded in battle twice, once so badly that he was a cripple. A man who was a peacemaker in the camps, and never quarreled. A generous man, who was always capturing horses from the enemy and giving them away, a man who constantly shared his kill with the poor and helpless when hunting, a man who could not bear to see one of the Hunkpapa unhappy. An affable, jocular, pleasant man, always making jokes and telling stories, keeping the people in a good humor, a sociable man who had tried to please everybody all his life, and was not in the least haughty or arrogant — in spite of his many honors. A family man, who stood well with matrons and old women whose domestic quarrels he had patched up, whose larders he had filled. A man who had the gift of prophecy, and could foretell the event of a battle, so that he was almost always victorious. A good singer, always in demand. A man who could speak, and think, and never was swindled by the whites. A man whose unshaken purpose was to maintain Hunkpapa laws and customs, and hold the Hunkpapa hunting grounds against all comers. A man who — and this weighed strongly with the conscientious Four Horns — was devoutly religious, whose prayers were strong, and who generally got what he prayed for. Finally, a man who — in five short years — had swept away the surrounding nations and occupied their hunting grounds.



Not least important in Four Horns' calculations was the fact that Sitting Bull had the unqualified support of the Midnight Strong Hearts, the most powerful warrior society in the tribe, without whose consent no chief could be named at all. Under Sitting Bull's leadership, this society had grown to have more than two hundred members. When they charged, they charged shouting, "We are Sitting Bull's boys!" A cry that struck terror to the enemy.

When Four Horns proposed Sitting Bull's name to the Midnight Strong Hearts as his nomination for a chieftaincy, he met with no opposition. The society was unanimous in supporting his nephew's candidacy. They all remembered that day when he was shot in the foot — that day when he killed the Crow chief. Many of them believed that the qualities of a man killed entered into the slayer: if Sitting Bull had the qualities of a chief, it was no surprise to them. That exploit had much to do with the approval of the warriors.



The old councillors, however, were perhaps more impressed by the thoughtful and studious cast of Sitting Bull's mind. It was certain that he spared no pains in getting ready for his enterprises; his forethought, among the heedless Sioux, made him remarkable. The old men now recalled a portent at his birth, which had been hard to explain at the time. It happened that shortly before Sitting Bull was born, an epidemic struck the camp on Grand River, and in the general grief and alarm, the unborn child turned over in his mother's womb. This strange and unusual event had puzzled men at the time. Now its meaning was clear: even before he was born, Sitting Bull was thinking of the welfare of his people!

A meeting was held, and Sitting Bull was sent for to be installed as chief. Four Horns was master of ceremonies.



Source: Vestal, Sitting Bull

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 6:43 am 

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ghostwarrior ,thank you for that information on how a man should be


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 6:59 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 466
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Greetings pahanna

there are those upon this planet who do not understand we have lived in this hemisphere for tens of thousands of years and in living upon these lands our Ancestors adapted to the environment around them... so to did our forms of self government and social customs and traditions... i understand completely and totally that the state of affairs that exist upon the lands of my People in terms of standard of living, poverty, desperation, suicide, drug and alcohol abuse are in direct relation to the assimilation efforts of the People of the america to destroy many aspects of our Lifeways that have also evolved over tens of thousands of years.

What i understand and know is that there is no cultural match that currently exists between Dakota People and the constitutional government that is being used to govern Crow Creek Dakota Oyate thus whatever is built by and through this government has always produced nothing but failure and will continue to do so unless it reflects the true voice of the General Council once more. The evidence is everywhere in the lands of Brothers and Sisters from all across this hemisphere that wasichu ways do not work for the Indigenous People who have lived in symbiotic relationship with the many Nations that were placed here by the Creator.

_________________
Damakotah!


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