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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2010 5:03 am 
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People !? if you know where the money is going to that are being collectet for Haiti .Then you will be shockt .I know that Haiti need.s help lots of help the poor Children are suffering and everything is out of control and if I had millions I would also give ,But I dont want to say more now .But I know I.m right in what I.m perceiving .AND again the the people are fooled???
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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 2010 3:37 pm 
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Location: Zeeland, North Dakota
ghostwarrior wrote:
I feel that paying the greedy and corrupt government of the united states illegal employment taxes can only lead to more problems for the People in the future. The united states will return to that particular well again and again now. What was the reason for the founding of the united states? NO TAXATION WITHOUT REPRESENTATION! Where are the representatives of Dakotah Oyate in washington, d.c.? Who represents the People? Certainly not the distinguished thieves and honored liars of congress.


NO TAXATION WITHOUT REPRESENTATION!

A memory, along with other promises.

I caught a glimpse of a movie last night. Was something about the revolutionary war. One of the state governors that refused to sign the Declaration of Independence was asked why he refused to fight a tyrant 2,000 miles away answered. "It is better to have one tyrant 2000 miles away than having 2000 tyrants one mile away."

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 2010 8:28 pm 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/11142 ... file5.html

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 6:10 pm 
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Once more we as men and human beings have failed the People of Dakotah Oyate. The eyes of many First Nations People were upon us... counting on us to stand strong in the face of the united states government and their illegal employment taxes.

As Dakotah Oyate we have lost another battle in our ongoing fight to return to sovereignty and self determination and i for one am ashamed. i like my great great great grandmother am beginning to think there are no more Dakotah, Lakotah or Nakotah warriors to defend the People, the land and the children.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 8:01 am 
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The Blue Helmets are coming... The Blue Helmets are coming to america and its about time. The United Nations has launched an investigation into human rights abuses by the united states government against the People of First Nations. More to follow...

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:08 am 
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i still think ALL of the indians of this country need to band together and form a "United Indian Nations"

Get all the indigenous peoples together...Choctaw, Creek, Cree, Lakotah, Cheyenne, Cherokee, Pawnee...ALL of them and form our own United Nations. Use this same body to act in interest of indigenous peoples as a whole. To act upon shameful acts against our peoples and represent them in the White House. And even go as far as defending with arms if needed, said peoples.

With proper matriarchal leadership, we would be a force to contend with.

Find a STRONG woman to make our leader, elect the proper council with limited terms of service and act in the interest of ALL native peoples.

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I must walk the red path, it is the only one...


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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 9:21 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
There is no protection but that which we are able to give ourselves and that requires dakotah men to be dakotah men again. How does it serve the People to pay employment taxes to the united states government? How is that serving the People?? How can that ever be serving the People??? Those are dollars that the children of Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate could desperately use in their day to day existence and make no mistake it is existence.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Wed Mar 10, 2010 4:02 pm 
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The UN regardless of whether they can help or not are a useful tool in carrying the message of the fight that First Nations are currently waging to return to indepedence... to the rest of the world. They are here in Albuquerque next week and you can be sure i will be there telling them of how the bureau of indian assimilation actually treats First Americans. Notwithstanding Kevin Gover's apology there has been no change in bia and never will be. they are a bureaucratic entity unto themselves and now dictate what happens in indian country...not congress. bureaucrats or distinguished thieves and honored liars of congresss running indian country... i vote neither.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sat Mar 13, 2010 8:47 am 
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The official position of the united states on human rights and human rights abuses.

http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/fs/2009/121764.htm

Yet the United Nations formed a committee specifically to come to the americas and investigate human rights abuses by the united states government against Native Americans.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 10:57 am 
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excerpted from: http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/project ... ml#CHAPTER

LIGHT AND SHADOWS OF A LONG EPISCOPATE (1902)[/i]
[i]Being Reminiscences and Recollections
of the Right Reverend Henry B. Whipple,
Bishop of Minnesota


CHAPTER X
THE DUTY OF CITIZENS CONCERNING THE INDIAN MASSACRE
MARCH 6, 1862 LETTER FROM BISHOP WHIPPLE TO PRESIDENT LINCOLN
LETTER TO THE BOARD OF MISSIONS "Report on the Moral and Temporal Conditions of the Indian Tribes on Our Western Borders"

CHAPTER X
August 18, 1862, the Sioux Indians began a massacre which desolated the entire western border of Minnesota. Eight hundred people were murdered. Many of these victims of savage vengeance had given me true-hearted hospitality, and my heart was filled with sorrow. I had feared an outbreak. Again and again I had said publicly that as certain as any fact of human history, a nation which sowed robbery would reap a harvest of blood. Thomas Jefferson said, "I tremble for the nation when I remember that God is just." In subsequent pages the causes of these Indian wars will be found.

The Sioux were a warlike people; they had been our friends. General Sibley, who was chief factor thirty years for the Northwest Fur Company, and: "It was the boast of the Sioux that they had never taken the life of a white man. In the earlier days of my residence amongst them I never locked the door of my trading-post, and when I rose in the morning I often found Indians camped on the floor. The only thing which I have ever had stolen was a curious pipe, which was returned by the mischievous boy who took it, after I had told the Indians that if the pipe were not returned I should keep the door locked.". . . .

The history of our first negotiations with the Sioux for the purchase of their lands, which included all of southern Minnesota, I do not know; but white men as well as Indians say that there was much deception connect with it.

I was in the Indian country when the Sioux came and made bitter complaints about the non-payment for the land sold from their reservation. Pay-Pay, an old Indian whom I had known at Faribault, came to me and asked, "How much money shall we receive at this payment?" "Twenty dollars per head," I answered, "the same as you have always received."

A few hours after he brought Wa-cou-ta to me, saying, "Tell him what you said."

I repeated my statement, feeling much anxiety, for it was evident that the Indians had heard that they were not to receive their payment.

When I returned from the Upper Agency, where I found the Indians must turbulent, I said to a trader's clerk, "Major Galbraith, the agent, is coming down to enroll the Indians for payment." He replied: "Galbraith is a fool. Why does he lie to them? I have heard from Washington that most of the appropriation has been used to pay claims against the Indians, They payment will not be made. I have told the Indians this, and have refused to trust them."

I was astounded that a trader's clerk should claim to know more about they payment than the government agent. I had never seen the Indians so restless. Every day some heathen dance took place, --- a monkey dance, a begging dance, or a scalp dance. Occasionally one of the men would refuse to shake hands with me. I knew what it meant, that he wanted to boast that he would not take the hand of a white man, which was always a danger signal.

I left the Sioux country, sad at heart, to pay a visit to the Chippewa Mission, and went as far as Red Lake. There I found the Chippewa much disturbed, showing that a storm was brewing. On my arrival at Crow Wing, Mr. Peake brought a letter from the post-office for Hole-in-the-Day, marked "immediate." I saw that the address had been written by Mr. Hinman. Hole-in-the-Day had gone to Leech Lake, and we asked one of his soldiers to read the letter which said:

Your young men have killed one of my people --- a farmer Indian. I have tried to keep my soldiers at home. They have gone for scalps. Look out.
(Signed) LITTLE CROW

As the Sioux and Chippewas were bitter enemies it was evident that Little Crow had made some treaty of peace with Hole-in-the-Day. I at once inquired if there were any Indians away, and finding that a family were camped on Gull River, twenty miles distant, I sent for them that night and they were saved. On my return journey, a day from Gull Lake, my Indians saw tracks and told me that the belong to the Sioux. I laughed at them and said, "There isn't a Sioux within a hundred miles." But they refused to go on. They stooped to the ground, and wherever they found traces of a footprint they carefully examined the crushed grass to see if the juice which had exuded were dry or fresh. Suddenly we came to a place where there had been a camp, and one of them picked up a moccasin, which he brought to me, saying, "Is that a Chippewa moccasin?"
"No," I said, "it is a Sioux moccasin."

The moccasins of the tribes are all make differently. The rest of the journey was of unceasing vigilance.

On Saturday I left Crow Wing form St. Cloud and heard of a party of Sioux back of Little Falls. I spent Sunday in St. Cloud, and that day these Indians committed a murder at Acton in order to precipitate a massacre. They reached Little Crow village before daybreak; a council of soldiers was called, and, against the advice of Little Crow, who afterward became their leader, they began their fearful warfare.

The pictorial papers containing the Civil War scenes, which the traders kept on their counters, deeply interested the Indians, who plied questions about the battles and their results. Up to this time, August, 1862, the Union troops had been defeated. Major Galbraith had enlisted a company of Renville Rangers, largely made up of mixed bloods, and many of the Indians supposed that the Government had sent for them to fight because so many of the white men had been killed. They said, "Now we can avenge our wrongs and get back to our country."

The morning of this day of blood, Mr. Hinman was sitting on the steps of the Mission House at the Lower Agency, talking with a man who was building our church, when suddenly a rapid firing was heard at the trading-post a quarter of a mile away. Sun-ka-ska (White Dog) appeared on a run, and when asked what the firing meant, answered: "The Indians have bad hearts and are killing the whites. I am going to Wabasha to stop it." In a few minutes, running at full speed, Little Crow appeared, and the same question was asked him; but he made no answer and ran on to the government barn, where Mr. Wagoner was trying to prevent the Indians from taking the horses. Little Crow cried, "Kill him!" and he was instantly shot.

Mr. Himan hastened to Mr. Prescott, the interpreter, who lived near by, to notify him of the outbreak. Mrs. Hinman was absent from the mission, but Miss West, the missionary, was advised to leave and cross the river, which she did, meeting on the way to the ferry a white woman and child whom he took under her protection. As they reached the bluff, after crossing the river, they met a party of Indians in war-paint and feather, who greeted them pleasantly with "He! Ho! Ho! You belong to the missionary. Washte! (Good!) Where are you going?" Miss West pointed to a house in the distance, and they said, "No, we are going to kill them," and motioned her to take the road leading to Fort Ripley. They threatened to kill the other woman, but to Miss West's statement that she had promised to take care of her they answered, "Ho! Ho!" and parted.

For weeks we had no tidings from the Sioux or Chippewa missions. They were dark days. When news came, we found that both missions had been destroyed; but our hearts were made glad when we learned that the only lives saved during that holocaust of death were by the Christian Indians, or friendly Indians, who had been influenced by the missionaries.

The wily chief, Hole-in-the-Day, had planned for a massacre at the same time on the northern border. But Enmegahbowh had sent a faithful messenger to Mille Lacs, to urge the Indians to be true to the whites and to send men to protect the fort. More than a hundred Mille Lacs warriors went at once to the fort, but meantime Emmegahbowh himself walked all night down Gull River, dragging a canoe containing his wife and children, that he might give warning to the fort. Two of his children died from the exposure. Messages were also sent to the white settlers, and before Hole-in-the-Day could begin war the massacre was averted.

The Commissioner of Indian Affairs, who was at the fort, was so filled with gratitude at the Mille Lacs Indians for their protection that he promised them that they should not only be rewarded by the Government, but should not be removed from their reservation. Pledges to that effect were incorporated in a treaty made shortly after, but the pledges were broken.

It would be too long a story to tell of the heroism of Taopi, Good Thunder, Wabasha, Wa-ha-can-ka-ma-za (Iron Shield), Simon A-nag-ma-ni, Lorenzo Laurence, Other Day, Thomas Robertson, Paul Maza-kute, Wa-kin-yan-ta-wa, and others who, at the risk of life, saved helpless women and children.

* * * * * * * * *

FARIBAULT, September, 1862

THE DUTY OF CITIZENS CONCERNING THE INDIAN MASSACRE

The late fearful massacre has brought sorrow to all our hearts. To see our beautiful state desolated, our homes broken up, and our entire border stained with blood, is a calamity which may well appall us. No wonder that deep indignation has been aroused and that our people cry vengeance. But if that vengeance is to be more than a savage thirst for blood, we must examine the causes which have brought this bloodshed, that our condemnation may fall on the guilty. No outbursts of passion, no temporary expediency, no deed of revenge can excuse us from the stern duties which such days of sorrow thrust upon us. . . .

In all our relations with the Indians we have persistently carried out the idea that they were a sovereign people. If it is true that a nation cannot exist within a nation, that these heathen were to send no ambassadors to us and we none to them, that they had no power to compel us to observe it for themselves, then our first step was a fatal step. They did not possess a single element of sovereignty; and had they possessed it, we could not, in justice to ourselves, have permitted them to exercise it in the duties necessary to a nation's self-existence.

The second most fatal error was a natural inference from the first. Because we had treated with them as an independent nation, we left them without government. Their own rude patriarchal government was always weakened and often destroyed by the new treaty relations. The chiefs lost all independence of action, and sooner or later became the pliant tools of traders and agents, powerful for mischief, but powerless for good. Nothing was given to supply the place of this defective tribal government. The only being in America who has no law to punish the guilty or protect the innocent, is the treaty Indian. . . .

The only law administered by ourselves was to pay a premium for crime. The penalty of theft was deducted from the annuity of the tribe, leading the thief to profit by his ill-gotten gains.

These evils have been increased by bad influences, and even fostered by the careless unconcern of the Government. We have taken no steps to restrain savage warfare among tribes at variance. They have murdered each other in our streets, fought beside our villages, even shaken gory scalps in our faces, and we did not know that we were nursing passions to break out in violence and blood. There was no mark of condemnation upon their pagan customs, for even high officials have paid the to hold heathen dances to amuse a crowd.

The Government, instead of compelling these men to live by honest labor, has fostered idleness, encouraged savage life by payment of money, by purchases of scalping knives and trinkets, and has really given the weight of influence on the side of heathen life.

The sale of fire-water has been almost unblushing, when it was known that while it made drunkards of white men, it made devils of red men.

The system of trade was ruinous to honest traders and pernicious to the Indian. It prevented all efforts for personal independence and acquisition of property. The debts of shiftless and indolent were paid out of the sale of the patrimony of the tribe. . . . The Government has promised that the Indians' homes should be secured by a patent. . . . But no patent has ever been issued. Every influence which could add to the degradation of this hapless race seems to be its inheritance.

Such a mistaken policy would be bad enough in the hands of the wisest and best men, but it is made a hundred-fold worse by making the office of an Indian agent one of reward for political services. It has been sought, not because it was one of the noblest trusts ever committed to men to try and redeem, . . . but because, upon a pittance of salary, a fortune could be realized in a few years.

The voice of this whole nation has declared that the Indian Department is the most corrupt in the Government. Citizens, editors, legislators, heads of the departments, and President alike agree that it has been characterized by inefficiency and fraud. The nation, knowing this, has winked at it. We have lacked the moral courage to stand up in the fear of God and demand a reform. More than all, it was not our money. It was a sacred trust confided to us by helpless men, where common manliness should have blushed for shame at the theft. . . .

It hardly needed any act of wrong to incite savage natures to murderous cruelty. But such instances were not wanting. Four years ago the Sioux sold the Government part of their reservation, the plea for the sale being the need of funds to aid them in civilization. . . . Of ninety-six thousand dollars due to the Lower Sioux not one cent has ever been received. All has been absorbed in claims except eight hundred and eighty dollars and fifty-eight cents, which is to their credit on the books at Washington. Of the portion belonging to the other Sioux, eighty-eight thousand, three hundred and fifty one dollars and twelve cents were also taken for claims. . . . For two years the Indians had demanded to know what had become of their money, and had again and again threatened revenge unless they were satisfied. Early last spring the traders informed the Indians that the next payment would be only half the usual amount, because the Indian debts had been paid at Washington. They were in some instances refused credit on this account.

It caused deep and widespread discontent. The agent was alarmed, and as early as May he wrote me that this new fraud must bring a harvest of woe, saying "God only knows what will be the result." In June, at the time fixed by custom, they came together for the payment. The agent could give no satisfactory reason for the delay. There was none to give. The Indians waited at the Agencies for two months, dissatisfied, turbulent, hungry, and then came the outbreak. . . . The money reached Fort Ripley the day after the outbreak. A part of the annuity had been taken for claims and at the eleventh hour, as the warrant on the treasury shows, as made up from other funds to save an Indian war. It was too late! Who is guilty of the causes which desolated our border? At whose door is the blood of these innocent victims? I believe that God will hold the nation guilty.

Our white race would not be proof against the corrupt influences which have clustered round these heathen. It would make a Sodom of any civilized community under heaven.

The leaders in the massacre were men who have always been the pliant tools of white men. When men like Little Crow and Hole-in-the-Day desired to open their budget of griefs, they could cite wrongs enough to stir savage blood to vengeance.

There is no man who does not feel that the savages who have committed these deeds of violence must meet their doom. The law of God and man alike require it; the stern necessities of self-protection demand it. . . .

But while we execute justice, our consciousness of wrong should lead us to the strictest scrutiny, lest we punish the innocent. Punishment loses its lesson when it is the vengeance of a mob. The mistaken cry, "Take law into our own hands!" is the essence of rebellion itself.

As citizens, we have the clear right to ask our rulers to punish the guilty. The state has the right to arraign these men in her Courts, but anything like mob violence is subversion of all law. It is a question for the judges to weigh calmly, how far any man, who was driven into this by savage leaders, and who committed no violence nor murder himself, shall be deemed guilty; and whatever that decision is, we ought to bow before the majesty of the law. There are others who, like Taopi, Good Thunder, Anagmani, and Wabasha, have a peculiar claim to our protection. Conscious of wrongs suffered, they resisted the outbreak, and to the last refused to join it. It was due to them that the captives were rescued and the guilty delivered up. In the face of death they were the white man's friend. Are we to reward their fidelity by a cry of extermination? . . .

As one whose life must be spent in Minnesota, whose home cannot be changed at will, whose lot for good or ill must be identified with her weal or woe, I feel a deep solicitude that our settlement of this war shall be such as to call down the blessing of God. The nation cannot afford to be unjust. No innocent victims of this massacre or a deeper indignation at the guilty actors in the bloody drama. And it is because I would forever prevent such scenes, that for three years I have pled with the Government to reform the system whose perennial fruit is blood. . . .

H.B. Whipple
Bishop of Minnesota
* * * * * * * * *

March 6, 1862
TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
The sad condition of the Indians of this State, who are my heathen wards, compels me to address you on their behalf. I ask only justice for a wronged and neglected race. I write the more cheerfully because I believe that the intentions of the Government have always been kind; but they have been thwarted by dishonest servants, ill-conceived plans, and defective instructions.

Before their treaty with the United States, the Indians of Minnesota were as favorably situated as an uncivilized race could well be. Their lakes, forests, and prairies furnished abundant game, and their hunts supplied them with valuable furs for the purchase of all articles of traffic. The great argument to secure the sale of their lands is the promise of their civilization. . . . The sale is made, and after the dishonesty which accompanies it there is usually enough money left, if honestly expended, to foster the Indians' desires for civilization. Remember, the parties to this contract are a great Christian Nation and a poor heathen people.

From the day of the treaty a rapid deterioration takes place. The Indian has sold the hunting-grounds necessary for his comfort as a wild man; His tribal relations are weakened; his chief's power and influence circumscribed; ad he will soon be left a helpless man without a government. a protector, or a friend, unless treaty is observed.

The Indian agents who are placed in trust of the honor and faith of the Government are generally selected without any reference to their fitness for the place. The Congressional delegation desires to award John Doe for party work, and John Doe desires the place because there is a tradition on the border that an Indian agent with fifteen hundred dollars a year can retire upon an ample fortune in four years.

The Indian agent appoints his subordinates from the same motive, either to reward his friends' service, or to fulfil the bidding of his Congressional patron. They are often men without any fitness, sometimes a disgrace to a Christian nation; whiskey-sellers, bar-room loungers, debauchers, selected to guide a heathen people. Then follow all the evils of bad example, of inefficiency, and of dishonesty, ---- the school a sham, the supplies wasted, the improvement fund or curtailed by fraudulent contracts. The Indian, bewildered, conscious of wrong, but helpless, has no refuge but to sink into a depth of brutishness. There have been noble instances of men who have tried to do their duty; but they have generally been powerless for lack of hearty cooperation of others, or because no man could withstand the corruption which has pervaded every department of Indian affairs.

The United States has virtually left the Indian without protection. . . . I can count up more than a dozen murders which have taken place in the Chippewa County within two years. . . . There is no law to protect the innocent or punish the guilty. The sale of whiskey, the open licentiousness, the neglect and want are fast dooming this people to death, and as sure as there is a God much of the guilt lies at the Nation's door.

The first question is, can these red men become civilized? I say, unhesitatingly, yes. The Indian is almost the only heathen man on earth who is not an idolater. In his wild state he is braver, more honest, and virtuous than most heathen races. He has warm home affections and strong love of kindred and country. The Government of England has, among Indians speaking the same language with our own, some marked instances of their capability of civilization. In Canada you will find there are hundreds of civilized and Christian Indians, while on this side of the line there is only degradation.

The first thing needed is honesty. There has been a marked deterioration in Indian affairs since the office has become one of mere political favoritism. Instructions are not worth the price of the ink with which they are written if they are to be carried out by corrupt agents. Every employee ought to be a man of purity, temperance, industry, and unquestioned integrity. Those selected to teach in any department must be men of peculiar fitnesss, --- patient, with quick perceptions, enlarged ideas, and men who love their work. They must be something better than so many drudges fed at the public crib.

The second step is to frame instructions so that the Indian shall be the ward of the Government. They cannot live without law. We have broken up, in part, their tribal relations, and they must have something in their place.

Whenever the Indian desires to abandon his wild life, the Government ought to aid him in building a house, in opening his farm, in providing utensils and implements of labor. His home should be conveyed to him by a patent, and be inalienable. It is a bitter cause of complaint that the Government has not fulfilled its pledges in this respect. It robs the Indian of manhood and leaves him subject to the tyranny of wild Indians, who destroy his crops, burn his fences, and appropriate the rewards of his labor.

The schools should be ample to receive all children who desire to attend. As it is, with six thousand dollars appropriated for the Lower Sioux for some seven years past, I doubt whether there is a child at the lower agency who can read who has not been taught by our missionary. Our Mission School has fifty children, and the entire cost of the mission, with three faithful teachers, every dollar of which passes through my own hands, is less than seven hundred dollars a year. I

In all future treaties it ought to be the object of the Government to pay the Indians in kind, supplying their wants at such times as they may require help. This valuable reform would only be a curse in the hands of a dishonest agent. If wisely and justly expended, the Indian would not be as he now is, ---often on the verge of starvation. . . .

It may be beyond my province to offer these suggestions; I have made them because my heart aches for this poor wronged people. The heads of the Department are too busy to visit the Indian country, and even if they did it would be to find the house swept and garnished for an official visitor. It seems to me that the surest plan to remedy these wrongs and to prevent them for the future, would be to appoint a commission of some three persons to examine the whole subject and to report to the Department a plan which should remedy the evils which have so long been a reproach to our nation. If such were appointed, it ought to be composed of men of inflexible integrity, of large heart, of clear head, of strong will, who fear God and love man. I should like to see it composed of men so high in character that they are above the reach of the political demagagues.

I have written to you freely with tll the frankness with which a Christian bishop has the right to write to the Chief Ruler of a great Christian Nation. My design his not been to complain of individuals, nor to make accusations. Bad as I believe some of the appointments to be, they are the fault of a political system. When I came to Minnesota I was startled at the degradation at my door. I give these men missions; God has blessed me, and I would count every trial I have had as a way of roses if I could save this people.

May God guide you and give you grace to order all things, so that the Government shall deal reghteously with the Indian nations in its charge.

Your servant for Christ's sake,
H.B. WHIPPLE,
Bishop of Minnesota.
* * * * * * * * *
LETTER TO THE BOARD OF MISSIONS
"Report on the Moral and Temporal Conditions of the Indian Tribes on Our Western Borders"
In every instance the original cause which led to our recent wars was conduct which would have been regarded as ample grounds for war by any civilized country on earth. The first outbreak was in Minnesota in 1862. These Indians had sold us a country as large as the State of New York, as beautiful as the eye ever rested upon; it had everything which the bounty of God could give for the use of wild men. Fish and wild game made it an Indian's paradise. Of the first sale I know nothing; the Indians said that after the bargain was made, their chiefs were bribed to sign a provision, which gave the larger part of the first payment to certain white men. They say they were then kept for months in a starving condition, until many of their people died; and it was this which made red men say to the Governor, "I will leave these bones of my people on the prairie, and some day the Great Spirit will look the white man in the face and ask him what has become of his red brother." For some time they were left without a reservation, and then denied the one which had been promised to them. In 1858 these Indians sold the Government eight hundred thousand acres of their reservation. The plea was they needed money for civilization. The treaty provided that no debts should be paid except as the Indians should acknowledge in open council. No such open council was ever held. There was a provision inserted in the treaty, --- of which the Indians say they were ignorant, --- which provided that the Secretary of the Interior might use any of their money as he thought best for them. After four years they had received nothing except a lot of useless goods sent to the Upper Sioux. Of the entire amount going to the Lower Sioux for this immense tract of land, all was taken for claims except about eight hundred and sixty-eight dollars. They waited four years; the story of our broken faith was often the subject of angry discussion. Old Wabasha said to me: "My father, four years ago I went to Washington. Our Great Father said to us, "If you live as white men I will help you more than I have ever done.' Four winters have passed and the fifth is nigh. It is so long a way to Washington the agents forget their Father's words, for they never do as he told us. You said you were sorry my young men had these foolish dances. I am sorry. The reason their wild life clings to them like a blanket is that their hearts are sick. The Indian's face is turned to the setting sun, and he thinks these are long journeys for himself and children. If your great Council at Washington would do as they promised, our people would believe them. The good Indian would become like his brother, and the bad Indian go away. I have heard of your words for my poor people. You have none of my blood in your veins, and I have none of yours; but you have spoken as a father speaks for his child whom he loves well. Often, when I sit alone in my tipi, your words will come back to me, and be like music to my heart."

It was not enough to take the price of their lands; a considerable part of their annuities was taken. The Indians come together for payment in June, at the time the treaty provided. They waited two months; they were starving. Maddened by hunger and the sense of wrong, and vainly dreaming that on account of the rebellion they could repossess the country, they began a massacre which depopulated our border for three hundred miles, ---eight hundred of our citizens lost their lives. Many a friend whose hospitality I had received, is to-day sleeping in a nameless grave. A nation which is too cowardly or too corrupt to redress such wrongs, will be too blind to punish the guilty or to protect the innocent. All Christian Indians were as true as martyrs. There are no more touching instances of fidelity in the history of the Church of Christ. Their deeds of bravery ought to live forever. Those who surrendered and the few who were captured were tried. Forty men had separate trials and were condemned to die in six hours. Three hundred were condemned to be hanged. Only thirty-eight suffered death, but of those some were innocent. The marshal of the prison told me that he went the next day to release a man who had been acquitted on the ground that he had saved a white woman's life. The Indians said, "He is not here; you hung him yesterday." The friendly Indians and the Winnebagoes, who were innocent, were taken to the Upper Missouri. Over one thousand died of disease and starvation. Soldiers tell the sad tale of women picking over the dung of their horses to find half-digested kernels of grain to save their children from death. An officer of the army told me he met a woman, whom he had known for years as a virtuous woman, who told him, with tears, that she had gone one hundred miles to degrade herself, to save her children from death. During this horrible winter a party of Indian women crossed to Faribault, several hundred miles, in the dead of winter, without a human habitation on the route, and living on routes, to tell me of their sorrows . . . .

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:32 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
I would like to invite any and all past or present members of the united states congress to please explain to me and the Dakotah People why Dakotah homelands and assets of the Dakotah People at Crow Creek Indian Reservation have been illegally seized by the united states internal revenue service, could they please point to the treaty provision with the People that remotely states or implies that we are citizens of the united states and are therefore subject to being taxed by any entity of the united states, and why was the dropping of the lawsuit in united states federal court a provision of the settlement with the irs in regards to this illegal tax burden upon a sovereign nation and her People?

In addition i would also like them to explain to the world how and why the first People of this land live in fourth world conditions and as second class citizens to everyone else that has since immigrated to our lands. Why our children continue to be stolen under the auspices of the bureau of indian affairs and state agencies. Why indian children all across america suffer hunger on a daily basis? why the central electric power cooperative of south dakotah is allowed to violate federal law by turning off power to homes of the elderly and children with medical conditions.

The two poorest counties in the united states encompass the People at Crow Creek and also the People at Pine Ridge who for the most part live a day to day existence. Under the crushing weight of poverty we still exist as surviving and distinct Nations within what is known as the united states and i am proud of my Dakotah Oyate for all they have endured from the Dakotah War of 1862 to the Massacre at Wounded Kneee in 1890 to the mothers and grandmothers of today fighting to get their children and grandchildren back from state agencies.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:40 am 
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We don't want apologies or excuses america... we want our Freedom.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:40 pm 
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Location: Zeeland, North Dakota
ghostwarrior wrote:
We don't want apologies or excuses america... we want our Freedom.


How does one reply to this? Those are not words, those are the blood and tears of over a thousand years of a great nation.


Perhaps it is time for the Creator to do a massive weeding of the Garden that was once known as Turtle Island. Replow the land and preserve only a handful of the best First Nation people and start fresh.


To see the destruction of the the First Nation is like watching a well planted and well cared for garden, be trampled by a mob of mindless beasts.


I can not watch the plight of the First Nation people without tears flowing down my cheek. I am sick from crying, I will take up my weapon, whatever it may be, and do what I can to fight the mad dogs.

As long as one Native American is denied freedom, all people living on this land are deprived of freedom. I may not be able to fight in body, but I can and will fight in spirit and with words.

Freedom has a sound and that sound is in the heartbeats of the First Nation people.

Those of us who will not nourish and support freedom, deserve slavery and may they have slavery, but do not force slavery upon me or those I love.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 4:44 pm 
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Neerdaels wrote:
ghostwarrior wrote:
We don't want apologies or excuses america... we want our Freedom.


Sovereignty.

What can you do to help? Leave us alone.



*applause*

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2010 5:51 pm 
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woodrow...

be not filled with despair. it is an honor this life of yours you offer but it would be an even greater honor that i were to die for you. you have never claimed to be an elder or wise but i feel you are both for you are a human being who understands. you are true to the ways of your Ancestors and i have much respect for that. its true the People have endured much at the hands of wasichu its all too true... but we have endured.

yes our Sacred Hoop is damaged but i do not feel in my heart that it is broken, it might be that i am wrong and Dakotah Oyate will in turn finally succumb and be destroyed as so many of the animal and people nations of this land have. yet many of the men and women who contribute to this forum have given me great hope for all of the People. for we are as varied as the leafs on a tree and when the wind shakes all the leaves togther it is a noise that can be heard from a great distance.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 9:28 am 
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TREATY WITH THE SIOUX, ETC.
August 19, 1825
Proclamation. Feb. 6, 1826.
7 Stat., 272.

Treaty with the Sioux and Chippewa, Sacs and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Sioux, Winnebago, and a portion of the Ottawa, Chippewa, Potawattomie, Tribes.

THE United States of America have seen with much regret, that wars have for many years been carried on between the Sioux and the Chippewas, and more recently between the confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux; and also between the Ioways and Sioux; which, if not terminated, may extend to the other tribes, and involve the Indians upon the Missouri, the Mississippi, and the Lakes, in general hostilities. In order, therefore, to promote peace among these tribes, and to establish boundaries among them and the other tribes who live in their vicinity, and thereby to remove all causes of future difficulty, the United States have invited the Chippewa, Sac, and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Sioux, Winnebago, and a portion of the Ottowa, Chippewa and Potawatomie Tribes of Indians living upon the Illinois, to assemble together, and in a spirit of mutual conciliation to accomplish these objects; and to aid therein, have appointed William Clark and Lewis Cass, Commissioners on their part, who have met the Chiefs, Warriors, and Representatives of the said tribes, and portion of tribes, at Prairie des Chiens, in the Territory of Michigan, and after full deliberation, the said tribes, and portions of tribes, have agreed with the United States, and with one another, upon the following articles:


ARTICLE 1.

There shall be a firm and perpetual peace between the Sioux and Chippewas; between the Sioux and the confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes; and between the Ioways and the Sioux.


ARTICLE 2.

It is agreed between the confederated Tribes of the Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux, that the Line between their respective countries shall be as follows: Commencing at the mouth of the Upper Ioway River, on the west bank of the Mississippi, and ascending the said Ioway river, to its left fork; thence up that fork to its source; thence crossing the fork of Red Cedar River, in a direct line to the second or upper fork of the Desmoines river; and thence in a direct line to the lower fork of the Calumet river; and down that river to its juncture with the Missouri river. But the Yancton band of the Sioux tribe, being principally interested in the establishment of the line from the Forks of the Desmoines to the Missouri, and not being sufficiently represented to render the definitive establishment of that line proper, it is expressly declared that the line from the forks of the Desmoines to the forks of the Calumet river, and down that river to the Missouri, is not to be considered as settled until the assent of the Yancton band shall be given thereto. And if the said band should refuse their assent, the arrangement of that portion of the boundary line shall be void, and the rights of the parties to the country bounded thereby, shall be the same as if no provision had been made for the extension of the line west of the forks of the Desmoines. And the Sacs and Foxes relinquish to the tribes interested therein, all their claim to land on the east side of the Mississippi river.


ARTICLE 3.

The Ioways accede to the arrangement between the Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux; but it is agreed between the Ioways and the confederated tribes of the Sacs and Foxes, that the Ioways have a just claim to a portion of the country between the boundary line described in the next preceding article, and the Missouri and Mississippi; and that the said Ioways, and Sacs and Foxes, shall peaceably occupy the same, until some satisfactory arrangement can be made between them for a division of their respective claims to country.


ARTICLE 4.

The Ottoes not being represented at this Council, and the Commissioners for the United States being anxious that justice should be done to all parties, and having reason to believe that the Ottoes have a just claim to a portion of the country upon the Missouri, east and south of the boundary line dividing the Sacs and Foxes and the Ioways, from the Sioux, it is agreed between the parties interested therein, and the United States, that the claim of the Ottoes shall not be affected by any thing herein contained; but the same shall remain as valid as if this treaty had not been formed.


ARTICLE 5.

It is agreed between the Sioux and the Chippewas, that the line dividing their respective countries shall commence at the Chippewa River, half a day's march below the falls; and from thence it shall run to Red Cedar River, immediately below the falls; from thence to the St. Croix River, which it strikes at a place called the standing cedar, about a day's paddle in a canoe, above the Lake at the mouth of that river; thence passing between two lakes called by the Chippewas "Green Lakes," and by the Sioux "the lakes they bury the Eagles in," and from thence to the standing cedar that "the Sioux Split;" thence to Rum River, crossing it at the mouth of a small creek called choaking creek, a long day's march from the Mississippi; thence to a point of woods that projects into the prairie, half a day's march from the Mississippi; thence in a straight line to the mouth of the first river which enters the Mississippi on its west side above the mouth of Sac river; thence ascending the said river (above the mouth of Sac river) to a small lake at its source; thence in a direct line to a lake at the head of Prairie river, which is supposed to enter the Crow Wing river on its South side; thence to Otter-tail lake Portage; thence to said Otter tail lake, and down through the middle thereof, to its outlet; thence in a direct line, so as to strike Buffalo river, half way from its source to its mouth, and down the said river to Red River; thence descending Red river to the mouth of Outard or Goose creek: The eastern boundary of the Sioux commences opposite the mouth of Ioway river, on the Mississippi, runs back two or three miles to the bluffs, follows the bluffs, crossing Bad axe river, to the mouth of Black river, and from Black river to half a day's march below the Falls of the Chippewa River.


ARTICLE 6.

It is agreed between the Chippewas and Winnebagoes, so far as they are mutually interested therein, that the southern boundary line of the Chippewa country shall commence on the Chippewa river aforesaid, half a day's march below the falls on that river, and run thence to the source of Clear Water river, a branch of the Chippewa; thence south to Black river; thence to a point where the woods project into the meadows, and thence to the Plover Portage of the Ouisconsin.


ARTICLE 7.

It is agreed between the Winnebagoes and the Sioux, Sacs and Foxes, Chippewas and Ottawas, Chippewas and Potawatomies of the Illinois, that the Winnebago country shall be bounded as follows: south easterly by Rock River, from its source near the Winnebago lake, to the Winnebago village, about forty miles above its mouth; westerly by the east line of the tract, lying upon the Mississippi, herein secured to the Ottawa, Chippewa and Potawatomie Indians, of the Illinois; and also by the high bluff, described in the Sioux boundary, and running north to Black river: from this point the Winnebagoes claim up Black river, to a point due west from the source of the left fork of the Ouisconsin; thence to the source of the said fork, and down the same to the Ouisconsin; thence down the Ouisconsin to the portage, and across the portage to Fox river; thence down Fox river to the Winnebago lake, and to the grand Kan Kanlin, including in their claim the whole of Winnebago lake; but, for the causes stated in the next article, this line from Black river must for the present be left indeterminate.


ARTICLE 8.

The representatives of the Menominies not being sufficiently acquainted with their proper boundaries, to settle the same definitively, and some uncertainty existing in consequence of the cession made by that tribe upon Fox River and Green Bay, to the New York Indians, it is agreed between the said Menominie tribe, and the Sioux, Chippewas, Winnebagoes, Ottawa, Chippewa and Potawatomie Indians of the Illinois, that the claim of the Menominies to any portion of the land within the boundaries allotted to either of the said tribes, shall not be barred by any stipulation herein; but the same shall remain as valid as if this treaty had not been concluded. It is, however, understood that the general claim of the Menominies is bounded on the north by the Chippewa country, on the east by Green Bay and lake Michigan extending as far south as Millawaukee river, and on the West they claim to Black River.


ARTICLE 9.

The country secured to the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomie tribes of the Illinois, is bounded as follows: Beginning at the Winnebago village, on Rock river, forty miles from its mouth and running thence down the Rock river to a line which runs from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi, and with that line to the Mississippi, opposite to Rock Island; thence up that river to the United States reservation, at the mouth of the Ouisconsin; thence with the south and east lines of the said reservation to the Ouisconsin; thence, southerly, passing the heads of the small streams emptying into the Mississippi, to the Rock river at the Winnebago village. The Illinois Indians have also a just claim to a portion of the country bounded south by the Indian boundary line aforesaid, running from the southern extreme of lake Michigan, east by lake Michigan, north by the Menominie country, and north-west by Rock river. This claim is recognized in the treaty concluded with the said Illinois tribes at St. Louis, August 24, 1816, but as the Millewakee and Manctoowalk bands are not represented at this Council, it cannot be now definitively adjusted.


ARTICLE 10.

All the tribes aforesaid acknowledge the general controlling power of the United States, and disclaim all dependence upon, and connection with, any other power. And the United States agree to, and recognize, the preceding boundaries, subject to the limitations and restrictions before provided. It being, however, well understood that the reservations at Fever River, at the Ouisconsin, and St. Peters, and the ancient settlements at Prairie des Chiens and Green Bay, and the land property thereto belonging, and the reservations made upon the Mississippi, for the use of the half breeds, in the treaty concluded with the Sacs and Foxes, August 24, 1824, are not claimed by either of the said tribes.


ARTICLE 11.

The United States agree, whenever the President may think it necessary and proper, to convene such of the tribes, either separately or together, as are interested in the lines left unsettled herein, and to recommend to them an amicable and final adjustment of their respective claims, so that the work, now happily begun, may be consummated. It is agreed, however, that a Council shall be held with the Yancton band of the Sioux, during the year 1826, to explain to them the stipulations of this treaty, and to procure their assent thereto, should they be disposed to give it, and also with the Ottoes, to settle and adjust their title to any of the country claimed by the Sacs, Foxes, and Ioways.


ARTICLE 12.

The Chippewa tribe being dispersed over a great extent of country, and the Chiefs of that tribe having requested, that such portion of them as may be thought proper, by the Government of the United States, may be assembled in 1826, upon some part of Lake Superior, that the objects and advantages of this treaty may be fully explained to them, so that the stipulations thereof may be observed by the warriors. The Commissioners of the United States assent thereto, and it is therefore agreed that a council shall accordingly be held for these purposes.


ARTICLE 13.

It is understood by all the tribes, parties hereto, that no tribe shall hunt within the acknowledged limits of any other without their assent, but it being the sole object of this arrangement to perpetuate a peace among them, and amicable relations being now restored, the Chiefs of all the tribes have expressed a determination, cheerfully to allow a reciprocal right of hunting on the lands of one another, permission being first asked and obtained, as before provided for.


ARTICLE 14.

Should any causes of difficulty hereafter unhappily arise between any of the tribes, parties hereunto, it is agreed that the other tribes shall interpose their good offices to remove such difficulties; and also that the government of the United States may take such measures as they may deem proper, to effect the same object.


ARTICLE 15.

This treaty shall be obligatory on the tribes, parties hereto, from and after the date hereof, and on the United States, from and after its ratification by the government thereof.

Done, and signed, and scaled, at Prairie des Chiens, in the territory of Michigan, this nineteenth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five, and of the independence of the United States the fiftieth.

William Clark, [L. S.]
Lewis Cass, [L. S.]
Sioux:
Wa-ba-sha, x or the leaf, [L. S.]
Pe-tet-te x Corbeau, little crow, [L. S.]
The Little x of the Wappitong tribe, [L. S.]
Tartunka-nasiah x Sussitong, [L. S.]
Sleepy Eyes, x Sossitong, [L. S.]
Two faces x Sossitong, [L. S.]
French Crow x Wappacoota, [L. S.]
Kee-jec x Wappacoota, [L. S.]
Tar-se-ga x Wappacoota, [L. S.]
Wa-ma-de-tun-ka x black dog, [L. S.]
Wan-na-ta x Yancton, or he that charges on his enemies, [L. S.]
Red Wing x [L. S.]
Ko-ko-ma-ko x [L. S.]
Sha-co-pe x the Sixth, [L. S.]
Pe-ni-si-on x [L. S.]
Eta-see-pa x Wabasha's band, [L. S.]
Wa-ka-u-hee, x Sioux band, rising thunder, [L. S.]
The Little Crow, x Sussetong, [L. S.]
Po-e-ha-pa x Me-da-we-con-tong, or eagle head, [L. S.]
Ta-ke-wa-pa x Wappitong, or medicine blanket, [L. S.]
Tench-ze-part, x his bow, [L. S.]
Masc-pu-lo-chas-tosh, x the white man, [L. S.]
Te-te-kar-munch, x the buffalo man, [L. S.]
Wa-sa-o-ta x Sussetong, or a great of hail, [L. S.]
Oeyah-ko-ca, x the crackling tract, [L. S.]
Mak-to-wah-ke-ark, x the bear, [L. S.]
Winnebagoes:
Les quatres jambes, [L. S.]
x Carimine, x the turtle that walks, [L. S.]
De-ca-ri, [L. S.]
x Wan-ca-ha-ga, x or snake's skin, [L. S.]
Sa-sa-ma-ni, [L. S.]
x Wa-non-che-qua, x the merchant, [L. S.]
Chon-que-pa, x or dog's head, [L. S.]
Cha-rat-chon, x the smoker, [L. S.]
Ca-ri-ca-si-ca, x he that kills the crow Watch-kat-o-que, x the grand canoe, [L. S.]
Ho-wa-mick-a, x the little elk, [L. S.]
Men omi nees:
Ma-can-me-ta, x medicine bear, [L. S.]
Chau-wee-nou-mi-tai, x medicine south wind, [L. S.]
Char-o-nee, x [L. S.]
Ma-wesh-a, x the little wolf, [L. S.]
A-ya-pas-mis-ai, x the thunder that turns, [L. S.]
Cha-ne-pau, x the riband, [L. S.]
La-me-quon, x the spoon, [L. S.]
En-im-e-tas, x the barking wolf, [L. S.]
Pape-at, x the one just arrived, [L. S.]
O-que-men-ce, x the little chief, [L. S.]

Chippewas:
Shinguaba x W'Ossin, 1st chief of the Chippewa nation, Saulte St. Marie, [L. S.]
Gitspee x Jiauba, 2d chief, [L. S.]
Gitspee x Waskee, or le boeuf of la pointe lake Superior, [L. S.]
Nain-a-boozhu, x of lapointe lake Superior, [L. S.]
Monga, x Zid or loon's foot of Fond du Lac, [L. S.]
Weescoup, x or sucre of Fond du Lac, [L. S.]
Mush-Koas, x or the elk of Fond du Lac, [L. S.]
Nau-bun x Aqeezhik, of Fond du Lac, [L. S.]
Kau-ta-waubeta, x or broken tooth of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Pugisaingegen, x or broken arm of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Kwee-weezaishish, x or gross guelle of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Ba-ba-see-kundade, x or curling hair of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Paashineep, x or man shooting at the mark of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Pu-ga-a-gik, x the little beef, Leech lake, [L. S.]
Pee-see-ker, x or buffalo, St. Croix band, [L. S.]
Nau-din, x or the wind, St. Croix band, [L. S.]
Nau-quan-a-bee, x of Mille lac, [L. S.]
Tu-kau-bis-hoo, x or crouching lynx of Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
The Red Devil, x of Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
The Track, x of Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
Ne-bo-na-bee, x the mermaid Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
Pi-a-gick, x the single man St. Croix, [L. S.]
Pu-in-a-ne-gi, x, or the hole in the day, Sandy lake, [L. S.]
Moose-o-mon-e, x plenty of elk, St. Croix band, [L. S.]
Nees-o-pe-na, x or two birds of Upper Red Cedar lake, [L. S.]
Shaata, x the pelican of Leech lake, [L. S.]
Che-on-o-quet, x the great cloud of Leech lake, [L. S.]
I-au-ben-see, x the little buck of Red lake, [L. S.]
Kia-wa-tas, x the tarrier of Leech lake, [L. S.]
Mau-ge-ga-bo, x the leaderof Leech lake, [L. S.]
Nan-go-tuck, x the flame of Leech lake, [L. S.]
Nee-si-day-sish, x the sky of Red lake, [L. S.]
Pee-chan-a-nim, x striped feather of Sandy lake, [L. S.]
White Devil, x of Leech lake, [L. S.]
Ka-ha-ka, x the sparrow, Lac Courte Oreille, [L. S.]
I-au-be-ence, x little buck of Rice lake, [L. S.]
Ca-ba-ma-bee, x the assembly of St. Croix, [L. S.]
Nau-gau-nosh, x the forward man lake Flambeau, [L. S.]
Caw-win-dow, x he that gathers berries of Sandy Lake, [L. S.]
On-que-ess, the mink, lake Superior, [L. S.]
Ke-we-ta-ke-pe, x all round the sky, [L. S.]
The-sees, x [L. S.]
Ottawas:
Chaboner, x or Chambly, [L. S.]
Shaw-fau-wick, x the mink, [L. S.]
Potawatomies:
Ignace, x [L. S.]
Ke-o-kuk, x [L. S.]
Che-chan-quose, x the little crane, [L. S.]
Taw-wa-na-nee, x the trader, [L. S.]

Sacs:
Na-o-tuk, x the stabbing chief, [L. S.]
Pish-ken-au-nee, x all fish, [L. S.]
Po-ko-nau-qua, x or broken arm, [L. S.]
Wau-kau-che, x eagle nose, [L. S.]
Quash-kaume, x jumping fish, [L. S.]
Ochaach, x the fisher, [L. S.]
Ke-o-kuck, x the watchful fox, [L. S.]
Skin-gwin-ee-see, the x ratler, [L. S.]
Was-ar-wis-ke-no, x the yellow bird, [L. S.]
Pau-ko-tuk, x the open sky, [L. S.]
Au-kaak-wan-e-suk, x he that vaults on the earth, [L. S.]
Mu-ku-taak-wan-wet, x[L. S.]
Mis-ke-bee, x the standing hair, [L. S.]

Foxes:
Wan-ba-law, x the playing fox, [L. S.]
Ti-a-mah, x the bear that makes the rocks shake, [L. S.]
Pee-ar-maski, x the jumping sturgeon, [L. S.]
Shagwa-na-tekwishu, x the thunder that is heard all over the world, [L. S.]
Mis-o-win, x moose deer horn, [L. S.]
No-ko-wot, x the down of the fur, [L. S.]
Nau-sa-wa-quot, x the bear that sleeps on the forks, [L. S.]
Shin-quirt-is, x the ratler, [L. S.]
O-lo-pee-aau, x or Mache-paho-ta, [L. S.]
the bear, [L. S.]
Keesis, x the sun, [L. S.]
No-wank, x he that gives too little, [L. S.]
Kan-ka-mote, x [L. S.]
Neck-wad, x [L. S.]
Ka-tuck-e-kan-ka, x the fox with a spotted breast, [L. S.]
Mock-to-back-sa-gum, x black tobacco, [L. S.]
Wes-kesa, x the bear family, [L. S.]

Ioways:
Ma-hos-ka, x the white cloud, [L. S.]
Pumpkin, x [L. S.]
Wa-ca-nee, x the painted medicine, [L. S.]
Tar-no-mun, x a great many deer, [L. S.]
Wa-hoo-ga, x the owl, [L. S.]
Ta-ca-mo-nee, x the lightning, [L. S.]
Wa-push-a, x the man killer, [L. S.]
To-nup-he-non-e, x the flea, [L. S.]
Mon-da-tonga, x [L. S.]
Cho-wa-row-a, x [L. S.]


Witnesses:

Thomas Biddie, secretary,
R. A. McCabe, Captain Fifth Infantry,
R. A. Forsyth,
N. Boilvin, United States Indian agent,
C. C. Trowbridge, sub Indian agent,
Henry R. SchoolCraft, United States Indian agent,
B. F. Harney, Surgeon U. S. Army,
W. B. Alexander, sub Indian agent,
Thomas Forsyth, agent Indian affairs,
Marvien Blondau,
David Bailey,
James M'Ilvaine, lieutenant U. S. Army,
Law. Taliaferro, Indian agent for Upper Mississippi,
John Holiday,
William Dickson,
S. Campbell, United States interpreter,
J. A. Lewis,
William Holiday,
Dunable Denejlevy,
Bela Chapman.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:33 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
The following site is a long list of theft by the united states government with maps that illustrate how much land was actually stolen by, in most cases, the distinguished thieves and honored liars of congress. its one thing to read bounded by this and bounded by that and to actually see the amount of territory involved. i don't recall exactly who in the forum (perhaps stardragon) said the united states paired freedom with greed... but that is indeed true. and in the process they removed or exterminated whole populations of men and animals that lived upon this land going back into the mists of time. and the sad thing is the great 'american' civilization has lasted a little over two hundred years now and if history is any indicator it seems highly doubtful america will make it another 200 years.

http://usgwarchives.net/maps/cessions/

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:56 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Now perhaps there will be an understanding of why 11 square miles are important to the People. the loss of 11 square inches to the government and the People of the united states is not something any American Indian Nation on this continent can afford any longer. another dangerous precedent has been set by paying employment taxes to the government of the united states... why would anyone WANT to pay into a tax system of a country of which we are at best 4th class citizens and have yet to honor one single word of their great and democratic principles and ideas when it comes to American Indian Nations. the day this arrangment was made with the internal revenue service of the us government was another dark day in the history of the People and for the People. for it was nothing more than extortion and a test of a Dakotah Oyate's aceptance to being taxed by the federal goverment. the government of the most powerful nation in the world revealed once more for what they truly are... a greedy, corrupt and bureaucratic ruling class.

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 11:07 am 
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Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
Here is some more truth... 40 PAGES worth outlining two hundred years of theft and deception by the government and the People of the united states.

http://www.nps.gov/history/nagpra/onlin ... /index.htm

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 Post subject: Re: A state of war between Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate and the US
PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 10:15 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2009 7:58 am
Posts: 466
Location: Crow Creek, Dakota Territory
there comes a time when you must decide within your own heart what is good and right. let your blood run true for it always will... remember the 38.... remember the 84 men, the 44 women and 18 children buried in a mass grave at wounded knee, sd, for which all of you men and women who serve that flag of the united states military must not give honors to until the People of the united states and their government honors their own words of democracy that the united states government holds as a standard for the rest of the world. how does that mess dress of the united states army feel... knowing in your heart and mind that that those chevrons represent the death of women and children of your own kind. once a marine always a marine.. what happened to once a dakotah always a dakotah. i have heard the voices of the children at crow creek then and now....have you mr marine. you served the very flag that enslaves us.... i am not sioux and sioux land is for sale. did you forget mr Sazue what it says on inyan. inscribed on inyan it says we are DAKOTAH. from our homeland minnesota and i will honor my words brandon you can have the sections inherited from my INA. i give them to the People of Crow Creek Dakotah Oyate. i ask nothing in return.

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